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Males Have Higher Salt Intake Than Women: Report

  A report has revealed that males have a higher salt intake than females. It also outlined baseline assessment of salt intake, knowledge, interventions and follow-up measures. The Fiji Sodium Intervention
29 Mar 2017 11:00
Males Have Higher Salt Intake Than Women: Report
From left: George Institute Australia, director of World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre on Salt, Dr Jacqui Webster and Permanent Secretary for Ministry of Health and Medical Services, Philip Davies at the Shangri-La’s Fiji Resort on Yanuca Island yesterday. Photo: Arishma Devi Narayan

 

A report has revealed that males have a higher salt intake than females. It also outlined baseline assessment of salt intake, knowledge, interventions and follow-up measures.

The Fiji Sodium Intervention Assessment (FSIA) report was handed over to the Ministry of Health and Medical Services permanent secretary, Philip Davies at the Shangri-La’s Fiji Resort on Yanuca Island yesterday.

The report gathered that males had a higher mean salt intake of 13.57 grams compared to females mean salt intake of 9.71grams.

But it also noted that the follow-up mean salt intake was 10.3 grams while the baseline mean salt intake was 11.7 grams. This showed that Fiji was making progress in reducing salt consumption, said George Institute Australia, director of World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre on Salt, Dr Jacqui Webster.

The FSIA project began in 2013 and was completed in December, last year.

Mr Davies said the ministry was looking forward to its recommendations.

“The research project included a baseline assessment of salt intake, knowledge, interventions and then follow-up measures,” Mr Davies said.

He said the intervention stage was linked with the ministry’s salt, sugar and fat reduction strategy and included an extensive education programme for health workers.

“There were also efforts to work with caterers, stores and manufacturers to increase the availability of healthier lower salt choices,” Mr Davies said.

Currently health stakeholders have been tasked to engage with importers and retailer to make available salt reduced products.

Dr Webster added that more work needed to be done in order to reduce further salt intake.

“The link between salt and health and increase in high blood pressure rates for Fiji indicate the need to upscale salt initiatives into Government policies and plans,” she said.

The parent project, Cost Effectiveness of Salt Reduction in the Pacific Project was a collaborative project of Pacific Research Centre for the Prevention of Obesity and Non Communicable Diseases, Fiji National University and The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Australia and the Ministry of Health and Medical Services.

Edited by Ranoba Baoa

Feedback:  arishma.narayan@fijisun.com.fj

 

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