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Mandarin Oranges Sell Like Hot Cake In Labasa

Mandarin Oranges Sell Like Hot Cake In Labasa
Teresia Letila selling oranges in Labasa on May 13 2017. Photo: Peni Drauna
May 19
11:00 2017

There is always a high demand for mandarin oranges, says Labasa vendor Teresia Ledua.

The 32-year- old market vendor loves selling mandarin in Labasa town because it always sells like hot cake.

The Dakuniba, Cakaudrove lady travels all the way to Labasa every Friday afternoon, spends the night and sells on Saturday.

“The mandarin that I bring from home would always be sold out because they say that it has a different taste from all the rest,” she said.

“I am convinced that this is because of the soil texture and quality in my village.”

According to Ms Ledua she usually prepares five sacks and a carton of mandarin to sell.

She travels with other vendors from Savusavu every Friday afternoon in a carrier where they pay a return fare of $25.

The money she gets is spent on the food for her children and for their school expenses.

For the Ms Letila she said education for her children was always a burden and thanked the Government for its free education policy.

“This has relieved us of all we used to spend on their books, school fees and bus fares,” she said.

She said now she could direct those funds into improving their standard of living.

Ms Letila sells her mandarin for $1 a heap.

More on mandarin oranges from Wikipedia –

Mandarins are usually eaten plain or in fruit salads. Specifically reddish-orange mandarin cultivars can be marketed as tangerines, but this is not a botanical classification.

Mandarins are smaller and oblate, rather than spherical like the common oranges (which are a mandarin hybrid). The taste is considered less sour, as well as sweeter and stronger. A ripe mandarin is firm to slightly soft, heavy for its size, and pebbly-skinned. The peel is very thin, with very little bitter white mesocarp, so they are usually easier to peel and to split into segments. Hybrids generally have these traits to a lesser degree.

The tree is more drought-tolerant than the fruit. The mandarin is tender and is damaged easily by cold. It can be grown in tropical and subtropical areas

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