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Karoko Villagers Battle Effects Of Climate Change With Limited Resources

Karoko Villagers Battle Effects Of  Climate Change With Limited Resources
Sea Level rise is a reality for the village of Karoko in Cakaudrove. Photo: Nacanieli Tuilevuka
January 05
11:00 2018

 

The reality of climate change is being taken seriously by villagers of Karoko in Tunuloa district, Cakaudrove.

According to the village climate change officer Teresia Powell, the rise in sea levels from the impact of climate change was something the village had to contend with over the past few years.

Today during high tide and storm surges the sea water still enters the village even though the USAID Coastal Community Adaptation Project (C-CAP) designed and constructed a 210 meters rock mattress revetment in 2016 to protect the village coastline from erosion and flooding.

She said the resilience of people with limited resources fighting the effects of climate change was evident in the village.

“We had received assistance from the American Embassy in 2016, yet when there is high tide or storm surge, the sea water still enters the village,” Mrs Powell said.

“The seawall has helped us to protect our village from eroding and flooding, however there is still a lot to be done to avoid the sea water entering the village and the coastline from eroding.

“Villagers must plant mangrove and other trees because this is a way of solving the problem of sea level rise and the effects of climate change. This will be the young people’s project for this year.”

She clarified that a recent photo posted on a Facebook page titled Fijian society and it’s a culture regarding Karoko Village was an old photo viewed 147 times.

“Children are used to the way of life in the village. There has not been a drowning incident in the village and we never take the risk because adults always supervise children when they are near the sea,” she said

“Many places are flooded during high tide and when there is heavy rain. During high tide the sea comes in and surrounds our homes near the seawall.”

Edited by Percy Kean

Feedback:  nacanieli.tuilevuka@fijisun.com.fj

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