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Ovalau Hosts First Family Caregivers Training For Lomaiviti Group

Ovalau Hosts First Family Caregivers Training For Lomaiviti Group
Minister for Women, Children and Poverty Alleviation Mereseini Vuniwaqa with the workshop participants during the first community training for family caregivers at the provincial meeting bure, Nasova, Levuka.
May 11
10:00 2018

To provide a much needed service to the vulnerable in society without being paid or recognised as part of the labour force in Fiji.

 

Those who provide caregiving services in community or family settings have been the silent and invisible workers in Fijian society.

These were the words of the Minister for Women, Children and Poverty Alleviation, Mereseini Vunuwaqa, at the official opening of the first Community Training for family caregivers at the Provincial Meeting Bure, Nasova, Levuka, Ovalau this week.

This was the first caregivers training session in the Lomaiviti Group.

During the National Women’s Expo in Suva last year, Ms Vuniwaqa said a lady from the Lomaiviti Group had approached and asked her if they could be empowered to be able to look after those living with disabilities in their communities, better.

“That was the idea that has led to the training and that is why we are holding this first training in Lomaiviti,” Mrs Vuniwaqa said.

She acknowledged the collaboration among the relevant stakeholders and particularly the Australia Pacific Training Centre (APTC) to ensure that a training package targeted at Family Caregivers in community settings eventuated.

The minister said the training was about providing a much needed service to the vulnerable in society without being paid or being recognised as part of the labour force in Fiji.

Ms Vuniwaqa said the training recognised the work that was done on a voluntary basis and the need to empower communities to be able to look after their loved ones who are in need of special individual support.

“This training is an acknowledgement of the demographic make-up of Fiji and the demands that it will place on our society in two to three decades ahead of us,” she said.

“This training will be the first of many.”

Ms Vuniwaqa said men were also part of the training because they recognised that men also played an important part in the wellbeing of their vulnerable loved ones.

“This training recognises the need to break through the glass of gender stereotyping, which has left men isolated from the core role of caregiving within their communities and their families,” she said.

“The men, who are here today, tells us as Fijians that men also want to share the privilege of looking after their vulnerable loved ones at home and in their communities.”

The two-day training ended yesterday.  Edited by Percy Kean

Feedback:  losirene.lacanivalu@fijisun.com.fj

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