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Kids Cancer Death Rate Drops: Doctor

Kids Cancer Death Rate Drops: Doctor
The President of Fiji Major General (Ret'd) Jioji Konusi Konrote cutting the cake with WOWS Kids to commemorate the launch of the Childhood Cancer Awareness Month at Tanoa Plaza Hotel on July 20, 2018. Photo: DEPTFO
July 22
12:17 2018

The mortality rate of children diagnosed with cancer in the 1980s were about 70 per cent.

However, since 2014, it has  decreased to between zero to 20 per cent.

This was highlighted by Dr Miriama Tukana-Thaggard of the Paediatric Oncology Centre at the Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Suva at the launch of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month on Friday.

Fijian President Major-General (Ret’d) Jioji Konusi Konrote said: “Fiji diagnoses 20 to 30 new cases of childhood cancer each year.”

“Awareness should be created, so that it can be diagnosed and treated early.

“The media plays a critical role in disseminating factual information and spread awareness through radio talkback shows, newspapers, television, magazines, and social media platforms.

“It is crucial that parents and guardians recognise early warning signs to ensure timely diagnosis, timely referrals, and proper treatment protocols,” he said.

Fijian born Australian author Sadhna Wilson said childhood cancer awareness month was dedicated to creating awareness of help and finding a cure.

“No one fights cancer alone, so please for this month hope that all our children can get the basic human rights to sing, dance, play, have an education, good health and above all, the right to grow up,” she said.

Profits from Ms Wilson’s cook book ‘Tropical Vegetarian’, which features a range of tropical vegetarian recipes from Fiji, will be donated to the WOWS Kids Charity.

Six-year-old Ayaan Ravitesh Chand, suffers from a lung tumor and was diagnosed at the age of four.

He lives with his grandparents and his aunts in Dilkusha Road, Nausori.

His aunt Neha Nandani Kumar said that the WOWS Kids had stepped in and helped their family enormously by covering the costs of medical expenses, buying toys and taking him out.

A parent Emele Wesley, 33, was at the event with her nine-year-old daughter Marythan Wesley who suffers from Plasma Thromboplastin Component (PTC), low blood platelets.

“We would like to thank WOWS Kids for giving us this opportunity,” Ms Wesley said.

“They have been very helpful, they encourage us through tough times.”

Ms Wesley said she was also grateful to the doctors at the Pediatric Oncology Services at Colonial War Memorial Hospital (CWM). Edited by Percy Kean

sheenam.chandra@fijisun.com.fj

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