NEWS

Analysis: SODELPA Needs Change Of Tactics If It Wants To Keep Gains

SODELPA’s big challenge for the 2022 General Election is to retain the extra six seats it won in the 2018 General Election. Despite what it says about the resolution of
09 Jan 2019 10:00
Analysis: SODELPA Needs Change Of Tactics If It Wants To Keep Gains
Opposition Member of Parliament Mosese Bulitavu (far right) and Opposition Whip Lynda Tabuya (second from left).

SODELPA’s big challenge for the 2022 General Election is to retain the extra six seats it won in the 2018 General Election.

Despite what it says about the resolution of the dispute between Opposition Whip Lynda Tabuya and MP Mosese Bulitavu, the row was not a good way to start 2019. It was not a good look.

SODELPA will put whatever spin it wants on the issue, the fact remains that the email exchanges between the two MPs reflect the internal conflicts that the party will have to deal with.

These include the clash between the fundamental cultural and religious traditions and values versus the modern and liberal thinking, lifestyles and practices.

In the past four years the internal bickering was all about personalities. And despite all the internal feuds that took place, the party bounced back to win six more seats.

Before it gets too carried away that it can repeat the same feat in the next election, it is important we look at how and why it did better than the 2014 results.

Some of the reasons include the following:

1) It rode on the strength of its propaganda of misinformation

2)  It appealed to the base instincts of the iTaukei through misleading statements on their ethnicity, governance, land, natural resources and their rights.

3) It ran a strong campaign in the rural and maritime areas, covered more villages and settlements than any other party through face to face meetings supported by audio discs carrying their messages.

4) Civil servants and teachers who did not like the reforms and preferred the SODELPA policy of no contracts, voted for the party.

5) Some of the Christian churches liked the SODELPA emphasis on religion

6) The court victory by Opposition Leader Sitiveni Rabuka boosted the party morale

Make no mistake FijiFirst is working out how it will counter the SODELPA propaganda in the next four years.

So SODELPA will not enjoy the same easy ride that it did in 2018.

Unless it changes its tactics, it could very well lose the six seats it gained, back to FijiFirst. Already Opposition leader Sitiveni Rabuka and Opposition Whip Lynda Tabuya are leading the change by cutting back on attacks against the Government and concentrating on issues.

Feedback:  selita.bolanavanua@fijisun.com.fj

Fiji Sun Instagram
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
error: