NATION

Early Cancer Detection Can Spare The Heartbreak

This is the case for Nazia Ali, whose son was diagnosed with cancer in 2014.
25 Jul 2020 15:34
Early Cancer Detection Can Spare The Heartbreak
Nazia Ali with her cancer survivor son Hazrat Shihaab Ali during the launch of the Child Cancer month at Tanoa Plaza Hotel in Suva on July 25 2020. Photo Wati Talebula

If there’s one clear message that cancer survivors and their loved ones continue preaching, it’s early detection that can spare one the heartbreak.

This is the case for Nazia Ali, whose son was diagnosed with cancer in 2014.

In a split second, when they sat down with the doctor and were informed of the news, their lives had changed and it all seemed as if their world would crash.

Ms Ali shared her experience, as caregiver to her now healthy cancer survivor son, during the Child Cancer awareness month launched at Tanoa Hotel in Suva yesterday.

“My son was three years at the time. His condition was extremely serious.

“He was weak with machines fixed on him. We were told that there was a chance of survival with his type of cancer and that was a ray of hope for us.

“He went through two and a half years of chemotherapy, injections, medicines and he took as many as seven tablets per day.”

Ms Ali said she never gave up and believed in the doctors.

“There were symptoms before diagnosis that we ignored.

Mary Bainimarama with children under the WOWS Kids programme during the launch of the Child Cancer Month at Tanoa Plaza Hotel in Suva on July 24, 2020. Photo: Wati Talebula

Mary Bainimarama with children under the WOWS Kids programme during the launch of the Child Cancer Month at Tanoa Plaza Hotel in Suva on July 24, 2020. Photo: Wati Talebula

“He had his last tablet on July 5, 2017. It has been three years since that day and he is living a normal life like any child.

“Always follow instructions given by doctors.

“I am grateful for the support given to me by loved ones, WOWS and everyone who had been part of our journey.”

Walk on Walk Strong (WOWS) founder Taholo Kami said: “We have 62 children that we are supporting and halfway through the year we have lost 11 already and that is the struggle with cancer.

“The reality of cancer is that this is a journey that takes months to years.”

Chief Guest, Mary Bainimarama said: “Childhood cancer is not a death sentence; it can be treated if presented early to hospitals.

“To remove the social stigma that is sometimes attached to childhood cancer rallying the support of our Fijian people for our champs as they battle this terrible disease is important.”

Edited by Ranoba Baoa

Feedback: wati.talebula@fijisun.com.fj

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