SPORTS

‘Decision Vital’

Decision-making determines what pass, run or tackle a player makes on the field. Making the right decision can be the difference between a try being scored, keeping possession or a turnover, or a win.
26 Sep 2022 15:27
‘Decision Vital’
Some of the Rooster Chicken Fijiana XVs rugby players to the Women’s Rugby World Cup (from left) Raijieli Daveua, Ilisapeci Delaiwau, Aloesi Nakoci and Raijeli Laqeretabua, at the Nadi International Airport on September 25, 2022. Photo: Nicolette Chambers

Decision-making determines what pass, run or tackle a player makes on the field. Making the right decision can be the difference between a try being scored, keeping possession or a turnover, or a win.

This key element of rugby will be vital for the Rooster Chicken Fiji­ana side that arrived in Auckland, New Zealand, yesterday, to play in their first Women’s Rugby World Cup.

The Fijiana XVs play England, ranked number one by World Rug­by, in their World Cup opener on October 8 at Eden Park, Auckland.

 

Seruvakula was far from happy with the number of bad decisions taken by his Fijiana players in the second half against Canada at the HFC Bank Stadium in Suva, last Friday.

The Fijians held Canada, ranked number three in the world, to a scoreless first half but bad options made in the second half that al­lowed the visitors to run away with a 24-7 victory.

Decision-making can only be effective if players are taught to look around them as the game is in motion and that is what Seruvakula looks to work on in the team’s first training run in Auck­land.

Speaking to SUNsports, Seruvaku­la said the team would have to work on their decision-making.

 

“We had a discussion about the wrong decisions made especially when we were defending our half,” the no-nonsense coach said.

“We have to execute our exit strat­egy well and try to play in their half. England will be really good at attacking our line so we have to execute our exits well.

There were some wrong decisions, it was a rainy weather and we were try­ing to avoid the lineout because it can be contested and lost easily.

 

 

We need to go back and play our own style of rugby that we are known for.”

Seruvakula also said they would need to work on their discipline and reduce the number of penal­ties.

“We can’t afford to give away penalties during the World Cup matches. I believe we should really work on our set-piece especially our scrums and lineout. We need to approach our scrum with disci­pline so we don’t give out penalties. We need to keep the ball because without the ball we cannot score points.”

 

Meanwhile, the Rugby Football Union has defended its decision to fly the England women’s squad to the World Cup in New Zealand in economy class – in contrast to their male counterparts. England’s men travelled to the 2019 World Cup in Japan in business class.

The RFU’s official travel partner, British Airways, does not fly direct­ly to New Zealand, so the Red Roses will fly with an alternative airline in the weekend.

 

It’s understood the players have a jet-leg acclimatization plan once they arrive in New Zealand.

They will begin light training on Tuesday and Wednesday, before re­turning to full training on Thurs­day. The Red Roses’ schedule has scope for flexibility, if required, to allow for full recovery.

 

Story By: simione.haravanua@fijisun.com.fj

 



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