Letters

Gandhi Day

Nand Kisor Chetty Flagstaff You had two reports in your paper recently on Professor Wadan Narsey’s  talk  to MGM students on October 20, at the Gandhi Day celebrations and prize-giving.
11 Oct 2012 08:51

Nand Kisor Chetty
Flagstaff

You had two reports in your paper recently on Professor Wadan Narsey’s  talk  to MGM students on October 20, at the Gandhi Day celebrations and prize-giving.
One was a straight report of the illuminating path of his talk, the other was more analytical account of the shady side alleys of his speech. I was there as a guest of Dr Narsey’s and got a few cheers from the students for being  an old boy, a relic of the first cohort of MGM School’s pioneering Form Five class.
I thought Dr Narsey spoke well and was a good choice of role model for the students, having himself excelled in sports and in academia. In introducing Dr Narsey the speaker remarked how he had won the 1500 metres in the inter-secondary meet for Marist School when he was a student there, and that his generation may have been the precursor of the Red Fire fervour.
Two points he made about Mahatma Gandhi were particularly noteworthy.
That the Mahatma was as much a product of the British as his Indian ancestry because of the moral fibre they put on display when they ruled.
Had another colonial power ruled India would he have become the great man he did?  Second, the great man from time to time displayed well known human frailties and Dr Narsey implied that Mahatmas too are human.
His speculative reference to what the Mahatma might say about our current affairs was relevant also because isn’t the search for truth eternal?
Besides, what good will come if our public intellectuals remain silent.




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