FIJI NEWS

Dr Eci on the Constitution

TALEBULA KATE Suva National Federation Party (NFP) candidate nominee and spokesperson for education Dr Eci Nabalarua, on Monday, outlined how the party would try to change the Constitution if elected
25 Jul 2014 08:48

Surendra Kumar, chairman of the Lodhia/Richmond Centre Crime Prevention with the Fiji Police Commissioner, Bernadus Groenewald. Photo: Nandni Vandhana

TALEBULA KATE
Suva

National Federation Party (NFP) candidate nominee and spokesperson for education Dr Eci Nabalarua, on Monday, outlined how the party would try to change the Constitution if elected into power.
She was respondig to a question put to the party by former vice-president Ratu Joni Madraiwiwi at Ulunivuaka meeting house on Bau Island on Tuesday.
Ratu Joni wanted to know how they would try to change the Constitution because it seemed very unlikely.
“Changing the constitution will be very difficult because of the procedures set out in the Constitution itself,” Ratu Joni said.
Dr Eci said to begin with, if they were in government, they would see that the Constitution would be what she called not passed in Parliament.
When that is done they will hold meetings with other parliamentarians to give their support for the change in the Constitution.
The main problem she said would be the 75 per cent of the registered voters needed to approve a change, but they would find a way out, she said.
However, the Constitution has already been signed into law, despite what Dr Nabalarua said.
Procedures for amendment of it are: –
160.—(1) A Bill for the amendment of this Constitution must be expressed as a Bill for an Act to amend this Constitution.
(2) A Bill for the amendment of this Constitution must be passed by Parliament in accordance with the following procedure—
(a) The Bill is read three times in Parliament;
(b) at the second and third readings, it is supported by the votes of at least three-quarters of the members of Parliament;
(c) an interval of at least 30 days elapses between the second and third readings and each of those readings is preceded by full opportunity for debate; and
(d) the third reading of the Bill in Parliament does not take place until after the relevant committee of Parliament has reported on the Bill to Parliament.
Ratu Joni said it was unlikely to have a 75 per cent in Parliament because of the party beliefs.
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