FIJI NEWS

POWER TO PEOPLE: PM

Sanjesh Narain RADIO TARANA, AUCKLAND When the Monasavu hydro dam was commissioned, the villagers in Naitasiri were told everybody would have access to electricity. But until 2006 only four villages
10 Aug 2014 10:38

FijiFirst party leader Voreqe Bainimarama speaking at the Vodafone Events Centre in Auckland, New Zealand. Photo: Hemant Parikh, Radio Tarana

Sanjesh Narain
RADIO TARANA, AUCKLAND

When the Monasavu hydro dam was commissioned, the villagers in Naitasiri were told everybody would have access to electricity.
But until 2006 only four villages had electricity, FijiFirst leader and Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama said in Auckland yesterday.
“Now all villages are being lit”.
He told 2000 people at the campaign meeting at Vodafone Events Centre, Manukau City, that the amount of development done by his government was far more than any other previous government.
“Tell me which government has done developments at this rate” “ he said.
This was his first trip back to NZ since 2006.
He said his government had moved away from racial discrimination.
“We should not discriminate between rich and poor, urban and rural, landowner and commoner. The new Constitution provides civil and political rights and promotes socio-economic rights.”
Mr Bainimarama was happy with the support and response from people.
He said the protesters were nowhere to be seen because they were outnumbered by FijiFirst suppporters.
An organiser who wanted to be anonymous said they had hired the events centre because it was a private property.
Protesters could not enter a private property.Replying to the remarks by protesters, Mr Bainimarama said “we want to make Fiji a fair just and a progressive Fiji”.
Most of the people who were supposed to ask questions, instead praised the excellent work of his government.
One person asked Mr Bainimarama whether he could ensure that there would not be any more coups.
He replied the country “needs a good decisive leader.”
Speaking to APNZ, Sebastian Joseph, who had left Fiji in 2003, because of the racism he experienced as an Indo-Fijian in Fiji, said Mr Bainimarama had created a Fiji that was fair for both iTaukei and Indo-Fijian.
“[The festival] is going to be really good. I’ve got a lot of respect for [Bainimarama].”
“He gave us fairness and the ability to call ourselves Fijians.”
According to Mr Joseph he was staying in Fiji without an identity before Mr Bainimarama stepped in.
Mr Joseph said the presence of the protestors did not ruin the positive atmosphere at the FijiFirst festival.
He said everyone at the event believed the elections would be fair and Mr Bainimarama would be elected PM “by a landslide”.
The PM returns home tomorrow.

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