SUNBIZ

No Barriers For Food Crop Farmers

The road to success for full time farmer Ratu Alipate Raitini was not easy. Originally from Wainimakutu village in Namosi, Mr Raitini managed to achieve his dream of increasing his
22 Sep 2014 08:42
No Barriers For Food Crop Farmers
Minister for Education Rosy Akbar and Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama shares cake with Suvavou Kindergarten students after the opening on August 12, 2020. Photo: Ronald Kumar.

The road to success for full time farmer Ratu Alipate Raitini was not easy.

Originally from Wainimakutu village in Namosi, Mr Raitini managed to achieve his dream of increasing his farm production from subsistence to semi commercial level.

He palnted dalo and cassava which was his main commodities until he decided to venture into banana farming after seeing the market opportunities. With the new venture he was also able to diversify his farm.

His bananas are sold at the Suva and Nadi market with prices ranging from 25 to 30 crates per week sold at $55 to $60 crates.

With his stable income generated from the production of banana, dalo and vegetables he was able to purchase a farm vehicle from Carpenters Motors worth $74,000.

The enthusiast farmer regularly hires people from within his community to work on his farm on a weekly basis paying them a wage of $15 a day.

He had also supplied 3980 banana suckers to the agriculture department in the province of Serua/Namosi under the capital programme Agriculture Extension Services.

The Namosi native won the Banana Farmer of the Year award  during the recent Central Division Agriculture show organised by the Ministry of Agriculture at Syria Park in Nausori.

Yam-Farmer-of-the-YearYam Farmer

Meanwhile a yam farmer from Veivatuloa, in Namosi pushes on despite the wet weather conditions and market demand.

Atunaisa Kaitabu, originally from Votualaiai in Nadroga won the Yam Farmer of the year award at the show.

The 55-year-old farmer displayed six different types of yams at the show.

“This is my fourth year participating at the show and I won the best yam farmer of the year award last year at Lautoka and I’ve won it again,” Mr Kaitabu said.

“Yam is a yearly crop. They resemble and are planted by real man as told by our forefathers for women.” He acquired 89 acres of land on a native lease since in 2004 of which he cultivates 5,000 mounds of mixed yam varieties.  It fetches an income of $12,000. This year he has already planted 3000 mounds of eight different varieties.

It decreased because of the demands of planting materials from farms as well as the sales of yam at the local market and the weather has been too wet.

Feedback:  maraia.vula@fijisun.com.fj

 

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