MAGAZINES

‘Adopt A Discipline Budget’

Drawing up a list before going out to shop is the best way to stay within your budget. And if you work within your budget, you will definitely save money.
03 Oct 2014 14:30
‘Adopt A Discipline Budget’
A protester with his face painted in the colors of an EU flag prepares to attend the "Together for the Final Say" event at the Parliament Square in London, Britain, on Oct. 19, 2019. (Photo by Stephen Chung/Xinhua)

Drawing up a list before going out to shop is the best way to stay within your budget.

And if you work within your budget, you will definitely save money.

This is the view of working mum, Vela Naucukidi when Sun Shopper interviewed her this week.

Miss Naucukidi, Teivovo Rugby Magazine’s senior writer believes that this is an important time and money saving skills in every household, especially for average earners.

Originally from Sawaieke, Gau but grew up in Lovoni, Ovalau, Miss Naucukidi shares her shopping tips today with our readers in the hope that it will help some.

As the sole breadwinner, Miss Naucukidi who is also the secretary for the Fiji Women Rugby Union said prioritising the needs over wants is always important.

ADOPTING A DISCIPLINED BUDGET

She said budget is something that is usually neglected in many homes.

Amother to two daughters, Jessie in Class 3 and Josifini in pre-school, Miss Naucukidi admitted being a lousy budgeter at times.

Being a parent – handling the family finances, caring for the children, putting up with stress at work, doing all the household chores and making sure that all meals are ready on time, can be a daunting task.

“When you combine the income reality with the other stresses of motherhood, it makes sense that budgeting is far from my mind.

“Think about it – one woman handling the finances, caring for the children, putting up with stress at work, cleaning the home, washing the clothes, making sure breakfast, lunch and supper (and a snack if she can afford it) are all available to the family every day, along with training the children in the way they should go.

“These are a lot of responsibilities for one woman to handle.  Budgeting, then, gets put on the back burner, when it could be the very thing that could relieve stress for the mother and help the kids’ every need be met.”

Miss Naucukidi explained that all these changed when she joined the Christian Mission Fellowship International Church.

At church, she got to learn about her purpose in life and the biblical truth about managing her finances.

It’s amazing, she said, and that was exactly what encouraged her to be on track with her budget.

She prefers to call it ‘a discipline budget’.

“I marvel at how we’re able to make ends meet, we live week to week and have a nominal amount in savings and when you look at numbers of what we bring in and what we pay out, it doesn’t balance out,” she said.

“Being on a strict budget means saying no to some things like eating out. We do that once a while when we think it’s appropriate. It’s different for every household in the country, for example, the income, equals what they want and how they run their lives but I guess we all have the same needs.

“My budget will be unique to my family. So if you’re on a strict budget like me, before going out to do your shopping, make a list of what you really need.

“Live with less. Buy only what you absolutely need. Better yet, do without. Work with what you have and not accumulate debt.”

MARKETING AND SHOPPING

Like all working mothers, Miss Naucukidi does her shopping mostly on a Friday afternoon if she works on Saturday.

Otherwise, she does her shopping on Saturday.

“I prefer those days because it’s our family tradition that we all do the shopping together,” she said.

“With the kind of job am in, every little time with the family is precious.

“Shopping with kids is also fun because they watch a lot of promotions on TV commercials. They do ask a lot of questions why am buying that and not the other one.

“They also learn at the same time,” she added with a laugh.

Again, she takes her kids to the market as well only to buy fruits and vegetables, mainly carrots, long beans and fruits.

This is because they get their dalo, cassava, tomatoes, cabbage, etc, from relatives in Ovalau and Nasaucoko.

She said this was also a way of saving money for her.

Feedback: losalinir@fijisun.com.fj

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