SPORTS

Koroisau: I Didn’t Want To Play

In the dead of night after the Rabbitohs’ preliminary final win over Sydney Roosters a fortnight ago, Apisai Koroisau’s phone rang. It was the call of a life time .
08 Oct 2014 10:06
Koroisau: I Didn’t Want To Play
Many Fijians from the business sector, tourism industry, construction and other sectors have praised the Fijian Government’s 2020-2021 National Budget. Photo: Naisa Koroi

In the dead of night after the Rabbitohs’ preliminary final win over Sydney Roosters a fortnight ago, Apisai Koroisau’s phone rang. It was the call of a life time . . . but the 21-year-old rake’s first reaction was one of dread.

As Souths came to terms with the likelihood hooker Issac Luke would be suspended for the grand final, coach Michael Maguire phoned Koroisau to tell him to be ready to play.

But such is Koroisau’s respect for Luke, he wished he wasn’t getting that opportunity.

“Madge called me on that Friday night after the game and told me to be ready just in case. They knew they were going to fight it, but he just asked me to be ready mentally,” Koroisau said.

“I didn’t really want to play to be honest. This bloke’s (Luke) been at the club seven years, I would have been happier for him to play.

“He’s been my closest mate at this whole club right by my side since I arrived. I wish he was out there with me. I haven’t looked up to any other hookers except him. He told me I was here in this team for a reason, and that really helped me mentally. I honestly can’t explain how I feel right now, the emotions are running through the roof.”

Aside from Luke, Koroisau also dedicated the win to his parents, particularly father, Sikeli who came to Australia from Fiji in 1985 to play rugby union with the Hornsby club.

“I’ve always tried to make them proud. There’s no one else I’d like to dedicate this win to, except for ‘Bully’ (Luke),” Koroisau continues.

“My dad played first grade for Hornsby, he was nicknamed ‘The Prince,’ he was great in attack and just lightning quick. He had a bit of a rep about him.

“He actually pushed me towards league, we didn’t have many union teams around the neighbourhood when I was growing up.”

Fittingly both Sikeli and Apisai’s mother Alumita were by his side in the victorious dressing room after the game.

“I’m just so happy for him . . . I’m lost for words,” Sikeli said.

“Growing up he just wanted to tackle everything, so I told him he better play league. I never expected him to win a competition so quickly. Nothing would have stopped me from coming to this match, nothing. This is his first grand final, it was very special for the whole family.”

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