NATION

Homes Tell Why They Do It

The president of a special home in Suva feels that families in Fiji today were not taking the responsibility to look after their elders or loved ones at home. Following
27 Oct 2014 10:14
Homes Tell Why They Do It

The president of a special home in Suva feels that families in Fiji today were not taking the responsibility to look after their elders or loved ones at home.

Following on from a plea to the public by the Minister for Women, Children and Poverty Alleviation, Rosy Akbar, the president of the Saint Vincent De Paul Society, Ben Hazelman, said the trend had changed and there were reasons why families were sending their elders or loved ones at homes now.

While Ms Akbar was visiting many homes around the country last week, she made a plea to the public to look after their parents or family members.

She said: “It is sad to see that some of the elderly members of the society end up in care homes. I plead with those out there who have left their parents in the homes, please there is still time, go back and ask for their forgiveness and get them back into the family.”

Traditionally in Fiji the elderly were looked after at home by their loved ones.

“The lifestyle had changed and there are few reasons as to why people push the elderly people to be looked after in our homes,” Mr Hazelman said.

Father Law Home in Wailekutu, Lami, also falls under the care of the Saint Vincent De Paul Society.

“In Father Law home we have about 25 residents and we take new residents once people die or move on, but here we are consistent. The residents in Vincent Home vary but at times it gets overcrowded,” he said.

“We have a full house but when there is need then we have to send some back to their home or co-ordinate with the Social Welfare Department which provides for alternative or more beds.”

He believes that families today must shoulder the responsibility to look after their loved ones but instead they just push them in homes.

“We do our best to give them love and care but the love and care from loved ones are still missing and it is heartbreaking to hear from them talk about their family,” Mr Hazelman said.

“They have done so much for the children, sacrificed most of their lives and this is how we repay them.”

Collectively the numbers in the residential homes fluctuate but they had people on their waiting list. They were taken in when a current resident dies or moves out.

The Pearce Home currently caters for four residents. The Home of Compassion has nine people under their care while the Samabula Old People’s Homes has 52 residents.

Home of Compassion Sister-in- charge, Emi Frances, said they did not take in anyone since January because of maintenance work, but usually they had more residents to look after.

Feedback:  farisha.ahmed@fijisun.com.fj

 



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