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For Safety Reasons, PSV Drivers Must Follow Traffic Rules

This newspaper has received reports from the public that some Public Service Vehicle (PSV) drivers are allegedly flouting traffic laws. The reports claim they smoke, use their mobile phones, play
28 Oct 2014 10:59
For Safety Reasons, PSV Drivers Must Follow Traffic Rules
LTA sign to all drivers in Suva. Photo: Rama

This newspaper has received reports from the public that some Public Service Vehicle (PSV) drivers are allegedly flouting traffic laws.

The reports claim they smoke, use their mobile phones, play loud lurid music while driving, and are arrogant and rude when confronted.

This unacceptable behaviour must stop otherwise it is only a matter of time before accidents occur. The culprits need to understand that whether they drive taxis or buses, the danger of ignoring rules  is real.

They have a moral responsibility to observe all safety precautions during their hired journeys.

Ultimately, they become accountable when accidents happen. They could lose their licence and spend time in prison. But they will not be able to compensate families of victims who are killed or badly injured. This is the sad reality of what can happen when traffic laws are broken.

Collectively, it is time for all stakeholders, and they include passengers, to stand up and do something.

Passengers should no longer tolerate any nonsense. They must tell offending drivers to stop the vehicle if they want to use take an incoming mobile phone call. They must remind drivers they can’t light up while driving. They can also tell them to lower the volume of music. If the drivers  refuse, take note of the registration number of the vehicles and  their names if possible and file a complaint with the Land Transport Authority and the Police. If we all do that, we might be able to see something done. It would also act as a deterent to drivers. They would have to think twice before they break the law. The LTA and the Police would have to investigate all complaints and give a clear signal that they mean business.

Naisa Tuinaceva, the chief executive officer of the LTA, says that drivers should remember that they are servants to the public and must act accordingly. He has encouraged the public to register complaints with them and they will take appropriate action. He says offending drivers will be taken to task or their licence suspended or taken away completely.

The other equally important role is played by the bus and taxi owners. It is disappointing that bus operators do not feel it is their responsibility to introduce a code of conduct for their drivers.

To totally rely on the LTA to monitor drivers’ conduct is an abdication of their responsibility. They employ drivers who are accountable to them. They must play their part too. Their contribution will help the LTA carry out its work and ensure public safety.

The issue of road safety is all our responsibility.

Feedback:  nemani.delaibatiki@fijisun.com.fj

 




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