Sunvoice

EDITORIAL: Join The Fight Against The Drug Nasties

The Fiji Police Force has confirmed that the AUS$30m (FJ$48m) heroin bust at the Lautoka Wharf last week was a transshipment case. This means that the illicit drugs were not
29 Dec 2014 12:37

The Fiji Police Force has confirmed that the AUS$30m (FJ$48m) heroin bust at the Lautoka Wharf last week was a transshipment case. This means that the illicit drugs were not destined for Fiji.

But just the thought of finding these drugs on our shores is enough to warrant the co-operation of all Fijians – not just the Fiji Police Force and the Fiji Revenue and Customs Authority.

Assistant Commissioner of Police and Chief of Investigation and Intelligence, Henry Brown has also sent out a warning to the public and business operators who may be lured by quick money in the transhipment of these drugs.

Steer clear or you will face the full brunt of the law.

A 40-year-old businessman has already been charged with one count of unlawful importation of illicit drugs while an Australian citizen remains in custody for his alleged involvement in the transshipment of the illicit substances.

As much as we need to work together as members of the public, the authorities here are doing the same with their counterparts overseas.

Fiji must not be used by drug dealers/unscrupulous business people as a transshipment hub.

The use and abuse of heroin is real around the world. It may produce a downer effect that quickly brings on a state of relaxation and euphoria – but it can also kill.

The US-based National Institute on Drug Abuse described the use of heroin as follows:

“Abusers typically report feeling a surge of pleasurable sensation—a “rush.” The intensity of the rush is a function of how much drug is taken and how rapidly the drug enters the brain and binds to the opioid receptors. With heroin, the rush is usually accompanied by a warm flushing of the skin, dry mouth, and a heavy feeling in the extremities, which may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and severe itching. After the initial effects, users usually will be drowsy for several hours; mental function is clouded; heart function slows; and breathing is also severely slowed, sometimes enough to be life-threatening. Slowed breathing can also lead to coma and permanent brain damage.”

Is this what we want to take hold in our islands. Say no to drugs. Say no to temptation. Report any approaches or information to the Police. Keep our islands clean.

 




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