Sunvoice

Zero Tolerance

Marijuana is bad for you. Don’t let the advocates for the decriminalisation of cannabis in Australia and New Zealand convince you otherwise. The Fiji Police Force are determined to end
08 Jan 2015 09:45
Zero Tolerance

Marijuana is bad for you. Don’t let the advocates for the decriminalisation of cannabis in Australia and New Zealand convince you otherwise. The Fiji Police Force are determined to end the illegal cultivation of marijuana around the country and so they should. Dare I say, like tobacco, nothing good ever came from smoking marijuana. Read the medical literature, its’ all there.

There’s a direct correlation between young people who smoke marijuana and there poor educational outcomes. According to a study by the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of New South Wales, young people who smoke marijuana on a daily basis are 60 per cent less likely to finish high school.

The consequences of smoking marijuana are clear:

 

– sensory distortion

– anxiety

– poor co-ordination of movement

– lowered reaction time

– increased heartbeat (and risk of heart attack)

– reduced resistance to common illnesses

– suppression of the immune system

– growth disorders

– increase of abnormally structured body cells

– reduction of male sex hormones

– rapid destruction of lung fibers and lesions

– reduced sexual capacity

– reduced ability to learn and retain information

– apathy, drowsiness, lack of motivation

– personality and mood changes

(Foundation for a Drug-Free World)

 

Illicit drug cultivation is a lucrative trade in Fiji. The word on the street, is single deals for dealers can net them anywhere from $10 to $500 a day.

Quick cash means an exponential increase in purchasing power. This translates to home renovations, washing machines, television screens, digital cameras and fishing boats to name some of the assets that local drug dealers have been known to acquire.

If the Fiji Police Force have their way, new legislation would mean these assets could be seized by authorities if it was proved that they were purchased through money made from the sale of illicit drugs.

Fighting an economic war against the drug trade is one way of addressing the problem.

However, fighting it on a cultural level is also effective. The Government and the corporate sector have made much of its health and wellness gospel campaign. The result has seen crowds attend the fitness walks, co-ordinated primarily by Westpac Bank. At the moment, these campaigns are urban-based. The drug heartland is out in the rural areas. Faith-based organisations like the Seventh Day Adventist Church and the Salvation Army have professional expertise in counselling and health awareness promotion in the war against drugs. Involving them as a proactive awareness partner would be beneficial for law enforcers like the Fiji Police Force. Advocates for the medical use of cannabis have their heads in the sand. There is no justification for its use. The Fiji Police believes this and we support them all the way.

 

Feedback: josuat@fijisun.com.fj

 




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