Sunvoice

Flag Should Be A Symbol Of Life And Hope

It’s official now. Fiji will be flying its new national flag on October 10 this year. The search begins for a national symbol, an icon, that represents our rich diversity
05 Feb 2015 08:35
Flag Should Be A Symbol Of Life And Hope

It’s official now. Fiji will be flying its new national flag on October 10 this year.

The search begins for a national symbol, an icon, that represents our rich diversity as a nation. We can look at birds, plants, trees, animals that are native to this country.

The second part is to come up with a design that reflects our environment and nationhood.

Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama has eloquently spoken about why we need a new flag. He says the new flag should reflect Fiji’s position in the world today as a modern and truly independent nation state.

We have cut the apron string that ties us to our colonial master, Britain. Yet, we have retained the Union Jack, the symbol of British power and sovereignty, on our flag. It is no longer relevant to the new Fiji. The Union Jack and the Coat of Arms are relics of our colonial past that are best consigned to history books instead of a flag in this modern era.

The “banner blue”  background should be retained because it represents the blue waters of Fiji and the Pacific Ocean.

It symbolises cleanliness, strength, dependability, coolness, peace, serenity, ethereal, spiritual, infinity

It conveys a sense of trust, loyalty and understanding.

Blue is the Number One favorite colour of all people.

Fifty three per cent of the flags in the world contain blue.

Blue is the most commonly used colour in corporate identity.

A dark blue suit is professional business attire.

Aristocracy is blue-blooded in all European languages.

Its universal appeal makes blue the appropriate colour to keep in our new Fiji flag.

What object represents the inclusive new Fiji?   Everyone is familiar with it and plays a significant role in nation building. If it’s in the plant/tree section, it’s got to be the coconut tree. It grows tall in the air. It reminds us that we can also grow tall and reach for the skies metaphorically. All parts of the coconut tree are used for a purpose. Nothing is thrown away. From the juice and flesh of a coconut to the leaves and trunk, they have their uses.

The  coconut tree  is also referred to as the “The Tree of Life” because of the endless list of products and by-products derived from its various parts. It depicts our nation, full of life, and giving everyone hope and equal opportunity to succeed.

On the sports field it’s the icon for the most popular game in the country, rugby. It evokes a feeling of patriotism every time our Vodafone Fiji 7s rugby team runs on to the field. Tomorrow and Saturday, it would feature prominently as our sevens heroes do battle to win the Wellington title at the Cake Tin.

From Ono-i-Lau in the most northern tip of Lau to Udu Point in Vanua Levu, to the Yasawas, West of Fiji and as far  South as Kadavu, everyone knows something about the coconut tree. In many of the maritime islands, it’s a food source. It’s sustenance.

That’s what a flag with a coconut tree as the symbol means. It stands for life and hope.

Feedback:  nemani.delaibatiki@fijisun.com.fj

 




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