SUNBIZ

Aussie Ginger Shores Up Pest Response Plan

On the back of an imported pest scare in 2014, the Australian ginger industry has signed on to the Emergency Plant Pest Response Deed (EPPRD). The Australian Ginger Industry Association
23 Feb 2015 10:16
Aussie Ginger Shores Up Pest Response Plan

On the back of an imported pest scare in 2014, the Australian ginger industry has signed on to the Emergency Plant Pest Response Deed (EPPRD).

The Australian Ginger Industry Association (AGIA) became a signatory to the EPPRD at a Plant Health Australia (PHA) meeting in Canberra late last year.

PHA is the custodian of the agreement, which sets out how plant pest incursions are dealt with and how the cost of an eradication response is cost shared.

With AGIA joining the EPPRD, there are now 40 parties to the agreement, including PHA, all Australian governments and 30 plant industries.

In September last year, live nematodes (roundworms) were found in a carton of Fijian ginger imported into Sydney, sparking industry outcry and calls for a cessation of all ginger imports.

In November, the Federal Department of Agriculture announced it would begin a review of import conditions for fresh Fijian ginger.

Minister for Agriculture Barnaby Joyce said the review was recommended in the Final Import Risk Analysis Report for fresh ginger from Fiji, published in January 2013, and had originally been scheduled to take place 12 months after the commencement of trade.

“The detection of live Root Knot nematode in ginger from Fiji has revived concerns about the potential prevalence of the Burrowing nematode, or Radopholus similis and any chance it may have survived the extensive import conditions applied to fresh ginger from Fiji,” Minister Joyce said.

“It is important that industry and the community have confidence in the import protocols imposed by the Department of Agriculture to mitigate risk.

“I am pleased therefore that the Director of Quarantine has brought forward the review in order to clarify the science around Radopholus similis.

“While tests performed by the Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry on a consignment of imported ginger did find live nematodes—root knot nematodes—these are already found in Australia and their presence was not a surprise, nor a quarantine concern.

 



Got A News Tip


Get updates from the Fiji Sun, handpicked and delivered to your inbox.


By entering your email address you're giving us permission to send you news and offers. You can opt-out at any time.


Subscribe-to-Newspaper