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Audio, Visual Seminar Paves Way For Film Industry

Film Fiji held its first formal Audio Visual Agents Consultation Seminar to pave the way forward for the film industry in the country. With our film industry having contributed $60
01 Mar 2015 10:29
Audio, Visual Seminar Paves Way For Film Industry
Film Fiji chairperson Shaenaz Voss, chief executive Dallas Foon and Permanent Secretary for Industry, Trade & Tourism Shaheen Ali at the inaugural 2015 Audio Visual Agents Consultation Seminar at Tanoa Plaza yesterday. Photo: RAMA

Film Fiji held its first formal Audio Visual Agents Consultation Seminar to pave the way forward for the film industry in the country.

With our film industry having contributed $60 million of the total Gross Domestic Product, it was evident that this could reap more benefits in the future.

Permanent Secretary for Industry, Trade & Tourism Shaheen Ali told seminar participants this was to be the ‘beginning of a long-term engagement and dialogue with all industry stakeholders’.

“This is not a new concept: Similar public-private partnership approaches have been taken within other sectors, such as tourism, manufacturing, services, to name but a few,” Mr Ali pointed out.

“The audio-visual industry is increasingly becoming a very important part of the Fijian economy.”

In 2014, the sector contributed 0.2 per cent of the GDP, earned over $55million direct income and employed a total of 440 locals in various productions.

The income generated from the industry has increased significantly, by over 220 percent and the number of productions increased from 28 in 2013 to 52 in 2014, he added.

In 2014, the budgets of all the productions in Fiji totaled $19.5million of which, $15.5million was actually spent in Fiji, which is approximately 79 percent of the total production cost.

“This is remarkable increase compared to 2012, when only 35.7 percent of the production expenses were spent in Fiji.

Beyond this was the fact that tourism, the backbone of the economy, could ride on the back of the international productions and commercials.

Mr Ali said the production of films and shows in Fiji increased the visibility of our country on the international stage, which in turn promotes and boosts the tourism sector by driving visitor arrivals.

With so much of this potential to be realised, Mr Ali set New Zealand as an example of how its tourism industry benefitted tourism and so was ours.

“In the last year, New Zealand experienced a 2.7 percent increase in Chinese visitor numbers, with total days spent also increasing by 31 percent.

“This was attributed to the famous television show adaptation movie “Where are we going Dad”, which was shot in New Zealand.

“The show had a viewership of 400million around the world. It is estimated that the 217 minutes of Chinese worth $169million.

The second season was shot on our very own Taveuni island where 400 production crew which had fully booked out the accommodation facilities at the production location.

The show premiered in Nadi on Tuesday and launched by the Minister for Industry, Trade & Tourism Faiyaz Koya.

Mr Ali said: “We are expecting a viewership of close to 1 billion people in China and around the world.

“The economic benefits will not be limited to just the activity created during the production. Like New Zealand, we are expecting continuous long-term tourism benefits from this production.”

Feedback:  ranobab@fijisun.com.fj

 




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