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EDITORIAL: Make Offenders Pay; Let’s Stop Carnage On Our Roads

Ravnil Chandra and his son Ayaan are lucky to be alive today after their car was hit by another car allegedly involved in street racing. In a separate accident, Inosi
01 Jun 2015 12:22
EDITORIAL: Make Offenders Pay; Let’s  Stop Carnage On Our Roads

Ravnil Chandra and his son Ayaan are lucky to be alive today after their car was hit by another car allegedly involved in street racing.

In a separate accident, Inosi Masaurua, 32, who has been in a coma since last week, has finally succumbed.

These accidents and others that happened at the weekend were preventable if road traffic rules were followed.

While pedestrians share equal responsibility with drivers to see that our roads are safe, most accidents are blamed on drivers.

If drivers employ defensive driving, many accidents can be avoided including those that clearly show that pedestrians are at fault.

Today we highlight the seriousness of carnage on our roads on pages 1, 3 and 4.

It tells us that drivers’ attitude to road safety rules and the standard of driving are appalling.

It’s apparent that drivers blatantly ignore warnings and road safety tips by the Police and the Land Transport Authority.

The two who were allegedly racing on Waimanu Road in Suva, if it was found that’s what they were doing, were not only stupid; they were idiots. One would have thought that the thrill and fun seekers would have chosen a quiet open country road where there is negligible traffic.

Maybe they were thinking their race was part of extreme sport where there are difficult odds. High-risk and dangerous challenges are the hallmark of extreme sport.

They chose a busy, narrow and winding piece of road from Samabula to Colonial War Memorial Hospital. The chasing driver reportedly could not negotiate a bend and hit an oncoming vehicle carrying Mr Chandra and Ayaan.

The road is one of several roads that lead into central Suva City and traffic is usually busy.

The driver who hit Mr Chandra’s car is lucky that Mr Chandra and Ayaan are still alive, otherwise he would be facing more serious charges.

This does not mean that the driver, who was also injured, has not committed a serious offence. All traffic infringements are serious because they can be contributing factors in an accident.

A bald tyre, an expired road worthiness certificate or a defective headlight can cause an accident if they impair the judgment o drivers.

The offending driver was also injured. He was treated at the hospital and discharged. But Mr Chandra and Ayaan are still in the hospital yesterday.

Mr Chandra is suffering from knee and neck pains and is unable to walk normally.

Ayaan, who fainted when their car came to a halt but cried when he was lifted from the car, is suffering from the traumatic experience.

These are worrying moments for Mrs Chandra, a nurse. No doubt she will be going through a bit of stress.

This is the tragedy of accidents. The human cost cannot be quantified.

But in dollar terms it’s a substantial loss that amounts to millions.

Losana Ligani, 22, is lamenting the loss of her husband, Inosi Masaurua.

They only married last year and their first anniversary is in September.

It’s a national shame that we continue to see these losses.

Tougher penalties for those responsible, particularly with the Waimanu Road accident, will send a clear signal that we do not condone irresponsible behaviour on our roads.

We must stop this menace.

 

Feedback: nemani.delaibatiki@fijisun.com.fj

 


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