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EDITORIAL: Carnivals Bring More Than Goodwill To Our Communities

People looking for indicators on the health of the Northern Division economy only need to check corporate interest in the Duavata Crime Prevention Carnival this year. According to organisers, this
12 Jun 2015 09:10
EDITORIAL: Carnivals Bring More Than Goodwill To Our Communities

People looking for indicators on the health of the Northern Division economy only need to check corporate interest in the Duavata Crime Prevention Carnival this year.

According to organisers, this year’s carnival will be bigger and better. That translates to the biggest number of contestants (26) since its inception. To call it a mere beauty pageant would reduce the social value of this event, focused on crime prevention in the Northern Division.

In fact, contestants will be required to speak on various issues ranging from drugs, cyber bullying, child abuse, truancy and other criminal activities. The carnival will be held at Subrail Park in Labasa from June 20 to June 27. The carnival will consist of six King contestants, eight Queen contestants, five Princess contestants, fourteen contestants and three Turaga contestants.

Only a few years ago, even Fiji’s biggest carnival was struggling to find corporate support. The Vodafone Fiji Hibiscus Festival has now morphed into a sophisticated, mega-event with the help of Fiji’s largest mobile phone company. At one time, it was struggling to find businesshouses to sponsor candidates, let alone make enough money to donate to charity.

As local fashion event icon Andhy Blake said recently, such events were not just about beauty but about giving Fijians a public platform to articulate their concerns and share their passion. His work with Miss World Fiji, began with a rocky start but now has gripped the imagination of many young Fijian women.

Never under-estimate the ability of these public events to provide a barometer for the pulse of the nation. If corporate sponsors are willing to part with their money, they do so with the confidence that the events will provide the necessary mileage for them. They have assessed risks and know that the returns far outweigh expenditure costs. Business is booming in Fiji, there’s no doubt about it.

One of the main beneficiaries are these carnivals, the most popular in Nadi, Lautoka and Sigatoka. There’s even talk of reviving the Tebara Festival in Nausori. Judging from the number of business stories we’ve run in the Fiji Sun about new businesses opening in Nausori, that’s not too surprising.

In August, Labasa residents will also be treated to the Vodafone Friendly North Festival. The Northern Division is definitely on a roll.  The Government is addressing sensitive land issues that affected the moral of farming communities and led an exodus of sorts of farming families to Suva, looking for new opportunities.

That’s the operative term, new opportunities. Business buoyed by the optimistic outlook of economic indicators for Fiji are looking to up their social responsibilities by contributing to these civic carnivals.

Northern residents are only too glad to benefit from this optimism. We’re happy for them. It’s good for business, good for families and communities and good for Fiji.

Feedback:  josuat@fijisun.com.fj

 

 




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