SUNCITY

Tour Group Visits Dragon Island

Komodo National Park is well known as the habitat of the largest lizard on earth – the Komodo dragon – and is one of the new Seven Wonders of the
16 Jun 2015 11:35
Tour Group Visits Dragon Island

Komodo National Park is well known as the habitat of the largest lizard on earth – the Komodo dragon – and is one of the new Seven Wonders of the World.

It is located in the west of Flores Island in the east Tilusa Tenggara province in Indonesia.

These species grow unusually in size, big enough to swallow a human being.

As part of a visit programme organised by the Indonesia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, journalists from around the world, including the Pacific Islands, were taken to the island to see this big reptile.

Komodo male dragons weigh more than the females, but it’s the female Komodo that are more aggressive. The largest Komodo is three metres long and weighs 91 kilograms. Usually, female Komodo dragons are the hunters.

The national park’s tour guide, Donatus Matur said the Komodo was called a dragon because it had a tail longer then its body and it had a body big enough to swallow a buffalo.

“Komodo dragon uses its tongue to detect taste and smell.

“They feed on wild animals mainly buffalo, deer and boar that live also in the island. We are trying our best to make it as natural as possible so we refrain from feeding it like normal animals in the zoo,” Mr Matur said.

“Komdo dragons don’t usually move together as a pack, it prefers living by its own self.

“Their mating season is usually from June to July. Whenever a Komodo finishes feeding its prey it takes one month for them to be hungry again and that’s when they start searching.”

“Komodo dragons prefer hot, dry and shady places to relax. They are capable of running at 50 kilometres per hour. A Komodo dragon gets aggressive if it is hungry or disturbed.

It can sense blood over 2km away from its prey. It possesses a venom bite that can lead to death. If you are not treated within four hours you are likely to die.

“Yes, people have been bitten or eaten by Komodo as well. The last incident was in 1974 when a young Swiss man got separated from his group during a tour to Rinca Island. His body has never been found.”

Clifford Faiparik, a senior journalist from Papua New Guinea, said it was a chance of life time to see this reptile.

“I am the first from PNG to visit this island, and yes seeing it with your naked eyes is a blessing,” he said.

For the tour group, this was the most exciting and something that we would cherish.

Feedback: paulini.ratulailai@fijisun.com.fj

 




Fiji Sun Instagram
Fiji Plus
Subscribe-to-Newspaper