SPORTS

Branding Rule

The International Olympic Committee has laid down advertising rules and regulations for the 2016 Rio Olympics. These needed to be abided by athletes and officials to protect their branding. One
17 Jun 2015 10:01
Branding Rule

The International Olympic Committee has laid down advertising rules and regulations for the 2016 Rio Olympics.
These needed to be abided by athletes and officials to protect their branding.

One of these includes the by-law Rule 50. It   was the main topic of discussion during the International Olympic committee Games Organising Committee Workshop with Oceania chef de missions and sports administrations at the Grand Pacific Hotel, Suva, last month.

Rule 50 states that no form of publicity or propaganda, commercial or otherwise, may appear on persons’ sportswear, accessories or more generally on any article of clothing, equipment whatsoever worn or used by athletes or other participants in the Olympic   Games except for

identification of the manufacturer of the article or equipment concerned.

This is provided that such identifications shall not be marked conspicuously for advertising purposes.

The IOC’s objective in implementing the rule is to protect the notion of a clean field of play by preventing conspicuous advertising, protect the rights of the respective National Olympic Committees, protect the technical specificities of International Federation requirements and protect the use of all national identifications.

Team Fiji chef de mission Cathy Wong earlier said their job now was to discuss with her contingent.

“Important thing now is to inform athletes on these rules on the applications and requirements of this rule.

“When you go to the Olympic rules, there are very strict guidelines you can and what you cannot do. So now it is up to us to go out and inform the people of what this rule is really about,” Wong said.

“The session has really taken us through the rules, disseminations of the rule and how to obey them,” she said.

Papua New Guinea Olympic Committee president Sir John Dawanicura believes the importance of abiding by the IOC advertising guideline.

“Some of our athletes might be brand ambassadors of a corporate company.

“At the end of the day, we need to abide by the IOC rule,” Sir Dawanicura said.

The Rule 50 affect all participants. It includes athletes, officials or accredited persons in Olympic Games venues, sites and press areas.

As presented by the IOC to the chef de missions during the workshop, the rule should be observed in competition venues, training venues, all non-competition venues and spectators are subjected also to the rule.

General principles

Clothing;

For clothing rule one identification of the manufacturer permitted to a maximum size of 30 square centimetre, one product technology identification permitted to a maximum size and where elastic material is used, the identification is measured worn or stretched.

Footwear;

Footwear may carry identification of the manufacturer as generally sold through the retail trade six months prior to the games.

Placements;

No identifications on the neck or collar or on the body (tattoos) and identifications may not create composite logo or repetitive effect.

Feedback: anasilinir@fijisun.com.fj

 

 

 


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