NEWS

OPINION: Prasad’s ‘Skirt Journalism’ Sexist And Defamatory

Biman Prasad’s attempt to link Fiji Sun’s managing editor news Jyoti Pratibha to skirt journalism is outrageously sexist and defamatory. It’s probably the reason why this below-the belt reference was
19 Jul 2015 11:15
OPINION: Prasad’s ‘Skirt Journalism’ Sexist And Defamatory

Biman Prasad’s attempt to link Fiji Sun’s managing editor news Jyoti Pratibha to skirt journalism is outrageously sexist and defamatory.

It’s probably the reason why this below-the belt reference was deleted from his article published in The Fiji Times yesterday.

Mr Prasad’s comments in response to a critical editorial by Ms Pratibha last Wednesday nevertheless were sent to more than one email address.

The National Federation Party MP and leader said skirt journalism was given new meaning via Ms Pratibha’s Editorial Comment. He implies that Ms Pratibha is linked to skirt journalism.

This is untrue, uncalled for and unbecoming of someone who likes to portray himself as a learned leader. The term “skirt journalism” in Fiji is commonly understood to refer to sexual liaison between female journalists and male news sources.

It came to the fore several years back. Two women journalists from The Fiji Times, the newspaper Mr Prasad has been speaking favourably about in Parliament and outside, were involved in a major controversy relating to this.

Ms Pratibha has never stooped so low. It’s an insult to her intelligence and integrity to be dragged by Mr Prasad into gutter politics like this. It typifies the male chauvinistic attitude common amongst some who still see women as sex objects and subservient to men.

Mr Prasad needs to retract that skirt journalism statement and apologise to Ms Pratibha. His lengthy statement, received Friday afternoon, is being referred to our lawyers tomorrow.

 

Height of hypocrisy

Mr Prasad cannot accept that the volume of advertising that goes to the respective media organisations is Government’s prerogative.

It’s a commercial decision and Government, no doubt, gives it thorough consideration based on its policies.

Mr Prasad said Government’s advertising policy was totally against its “professed principle of equal citizenry, which it says is the cornerstone of the 2013 Constitution. Similarly the right of the people to freedom of speech, expression, thought, opinion and publication which primarily is freedom to seek, receive and impart information, knowledge and ideas under Section 17 of the Constitution.”

But Mr Prasad fails to practise what he preaches. He talks to the Fiji Sun when it suits him and same time condones the ban on this newspaper by the Opposition.

The Opposition Office has made it public that it does not speak to the Fiji Sun, FBC and Vijay Narayan of CFL.

The contradictions are glaring.

 

Daily Post

Mr Prasad has dragged me into the fray in his tirade against Ms Pratibha, regarding the now defunct Daily Post.

To set the record straight, I had come back from New Zealand and worked as editor-in-chief for the newspaper from 1991 to 1996 before I returned to New Zealand. I had been recommended for the role by Peter Lomas when he was asked by the Daily Post to suggest someone who could guide the newspaper as it battled to grow despite the total market dominance held then by the Fiji Times.

During this period it took a lot of sacrifice and hard work to build the newspaper from a weekly to a daily with other publications on the side.

Nothing was handed to us on the silver platter. We had to work hard for everything we got.

Sitiveni Rabuka’s SVT Government was in power then.

When I left to return to New Zealand in 1996, the Daily Post was doing well.

I am not privy to the events that led to its closure.

Feedback: nemani.delaibatiki@fijisun.com.fj

 

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