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Ratu Inoke Talks Climate Change At UN

The Minister for Foreign Affairs, Ratu Inoke Kubuabola, spoke on three issues at the United Nations Security Council’s open debate on peace and security challenges facing Small Islands Developing States
01 Aug 2015 10:30
Ratu Inoke Talks Climate Change At UN

The Minister for Foreign Affairs, Ratu Inoke Kubuabola, spoke on three issues at the United Nations Security Council’s open debate on peace and security challenges facing Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), in New York yesterday.

He spoke on climate change, the threats to the bio-diversity of the world’s environment, with particular emphasis on oceans and seas and the vulnerability of SIDS, to the criminal activities of the wider international community.

 

Climate change

He said climate change had emerged as the biggest threat to the security of SIDS and Fiji was no exception in this regard.

“Climate Change has been accurately described as a risk-multiplier,” he said.

Ratu Inoke said while the rest of the world endlessly debated the implications of climate change, in the small islands and atolls of the Pacific they had to deal with the problem because it was already upon them.

“To respond to the security threats of climate change, they needed strategic investments in adaptation measures.

“We believe it is for the Security Council and development partners to bring greater international effort to ensuring we have the capacity, both human and institutional, to deal with this existential threat to the security of the Small Islands Developing States,” he said.

Threats to oceans and seas

Ratu Inoke said it was essential they protected and restored the health, productivity and resilience of our oceans, marine ecosystems and fisheries.

“We are challenged to maintain their bio-diversity, enable their conservation, and manage the sustainable use of their resources for present and future generations.”

The marine environment he said provided opportunities for sustainable economic growth for SIDS, but only if they could overcome existing threats.

Ratu Inoke said the ongoing over-exploitation of oceans resources through illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing was a significant security threat for SIDS, in relation to both sovereignty issues, as well as the overall sustainability of marine resources.

“We call upon bodies such as this council, to help Small Island Developing States overcome this problem by coalescing in international co-operation and technical support mechanisms to strengthen monitoring, control and surveillance of our oceans.”

 

The vulnerability of SIDS

The third area he spoke on was that of the vulnerability of SIDS to the criminal activities of the wider international community.

“By definition SIDS are vulnerable because of their small size, developing economies and isolated locations.”

He said many struggled to adequately control their sovereign boundaries.  The resources of organised crimes from larger countries often exceeded those of SIDS.

Feedback: maikab@fijisun.com.fj

 

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