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EDITORIAL: An Inclusive Budget Process for the Inclusive New Fiji

A country’s national budget does not impact just the business community but each and every citizen of the country. Therefore, inclusive contribution is critically important during the consultation process. The
31 Aug 2015 09:42
EDITORIAL: An Inclusive Budget Process for the Inclusive New Fiji

A country’s national budget does not impact just the business community but each and every citizen of the country.

Therefore, inclusive contribution is critically important during the consultation process.

The presence of the Minister for Finance Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum in Labasa on Saturday for consultations was a good indication of the FijiFirst Government wanting to hear from every segment of the society.

Here we have the Minister for Finance wanting to meet with people of all walks of life and hear what they want included in the Budget. Even going to the extent of having one-on-one discussions.

This is groundbreaking.

It’s also an opportunity for all Fijians to get interested in the policies which could ultimately improve their livelihoods.

We have some people posting on social media about where they think things are going wrong and what need to be changed.

But are these same people coming up and making submissions making their opinions count? Or are these just the usual long-distance critics taking pot shots from their new homes and new citizenship in far away lands?

Kudos to all the 100 or so people who participated at the consultations in Labasa.

Kudos to Mr Sayed-Khaiyum for being so willing to listen to them.

And as for those who did not come forward and give their views? You cannot say that this trailblazing FijiFirst Government has not given you the opportunity.

Out with the Finglish

Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama made excellent points on Saturday night while addressing Fiji National University’s Alumni Dinner at the GPH.

They included highlighting the deteriorating standard of written English in our country.

As Mr Bainimarama said:

“I don’t think there’s any doubt about the steady deterioration in the quality of English expression in Fiji over the years. And unfortunately, it is across the board.

“We see it in our schools, our tertiary institutions, government, the private sector and even in the media – far too many people who make basic errors of spelling, grammar and sentence construction.  It is a particular curse in the civil service, where I continually see even the most senior people unable to write English with clarity, simplicity and in the correct manner.”

Why is getting our English right so important? As Mr Bainimarama stressed:

“We certainly need to do so when we go out into the world and compete against other nations where English is the mother tongue. English is also increasingly THE global language of commerce and many other areas of human endeavour.

“Maintaining and improving our national capability to speak and write English to international standards is very important. Finglish – Fiji English – may be OK around the grog bowl but we need to meet basic international standards and, generally speaking, I think we are falling short of the mark.”

Words so true. Words we should all heed. Words that our Publisher has already circulated to all who work here on this English-language newspaper.

Feedback:  rachnal@fijisun.com.fj

 

 

 

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