Sunwheels

Everyone Is A Pedestrian Here

Everyone is a pedestrian at some point. Every time you leave your house, walk into a store, cross the street with your child, go for a jog or walk through
28 Nov 2015 10:37
Everyone Is A Pedestrian Here

Everyone is a pedestrian at some point. Every time you leave your house, walk into a store, cross the street with your child, go for a jog or walk through a park, you are a pedestrian.
You might walk for fun, for your health or as a means of transportation. Whatever the reason, everyone is a pedestrian and everyone plays a role in keeping our roadways safe.
There are many types of pedestrians. From the moment people take their first steps–and for every step after that–they will encounter various scenarios that require a unique focus for ensuring pedestrian safety.
Concerns will continuously evolve as pedestrians navigate through the various stages of life.
As a pedestrian you are exposed to more danger and risks from ongoing traffic, while out and about in the open ensure your “sixth senses” is switch on at all times.
A pedestrian becomes vulnerable whilst on the road because they are not equipped with safety or accident preventative measures that are available in vehicles such as seatbelts and airbag, however their only proactive action is to stay focus and being alert.

Always remember to:
Take time to be aware of your surroundings. Many collisions are caused by carelessness on the part of the driver or pedestrian. Always pay attention to vehicles around you, and follow all traffic rules.
Avoid distractions. Cell phones, handheld devices, video games, newspapers, headphones, eating or anything thing else that takes your eyes, ears or mind off the road is a distraction.
Any of these has the potential to distract you at the exact moment that you need to be alert.
Stay Sober.
Accident analysis showed that some traffic crashes resulting in pedestrian casualties involved alcohol consumption. Alcohol impairs your decision-making skills, physical reflexes and other abilities just as much on your feet at it does behind the wheel.
Remember to stay in well-lit areas and to wear light or reflective clothing. Never assume drivers see you just because you see them. Wear shoes that provide ample foot and ankle support and have suitable grip to prevent sliding or slipping. Whenever possible, stay on sidewalks and pathways.
If a sidewalk is not available, stay to the far side of the road and always face traffic. Be sure to be as visible as possible. A stopped car can obstruct the view of other drivers.
Beware that if a driver lets you pass, is does not necessarily mean other drivers are aware that you are crossing.
Use crosswalks when possible and follow all traffic signals.
Plan your route so you can always use crosswalks, and be sure to avoid any hazardous crossings or busy streets during times of heavy traffic. Look both ways when you cross the street, even at a crosswalk. Allow yourself enough time to cross the street.
If a walk sign has been lit for a while, or the caution sign has begun to blink, it is wise to wait for a new green signal to have the maximum time to cross the street. Do not assume a driver will stop for you because you are in a crosswalk.
Be careful. Not all drivers will follow pedestrian traffic rules or signs. Always be aware of vehicles that are around you so you may take control of your own safety.

Fiji Sun Instagram
Fiji Plus
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
error: