Sunvoice

Let’s Support FICAC Fight Corruption

Tomorrow is Anti-Corruption Day and staff of the Fiji Independent Commission Against Corruption (FICAC) will be out there to meet people and explain the commission’s work. This will be a
08 Dec 2015 10:33
Let’s Support  FICAC Fight Corruption

Tomorrow is Anti-Corruption Day and staff of the Fiji Independent Commission Against Corruption (FICAC) will be out there to meet people and explain the commission’s work.
This will be a great opportunity for the people to get clarification on issues relating to corruption.
Questions you may have could include: What kind of issues are bordering on corruption?
What are the signposts that should ring the alarm bells?
Are the identities of informers protected? You may have more and this is your opportunity to get the answers to your questions.
The number of cases that has come before the courts and successfully prosecuted by FICAC justifies the commission’s existence and its purpose.
According to FICAC, corruption has become a global phenomenon and is wide spread across all sectors of life.
It says: “It can be referred to as the destruction of an individual’s loyalty or honesty through undermining self-righteousness or integrity. There tends to be no standardized definition for corruption as the definition differs from one country to another. However, accomplished researchers such as Robert Klitgard define corruption as the abuse of public resources or funds for private gain.”
To eradicate and to dismantle the high walls of corruption Anti-Corruption Agencies ratified under the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) commemorate International Anti-Corruption Day onDecember 9, as a means
to mount a global response to corruption. FICAC must be commended for its work and achievements since its inception in 2007.
FICAC has successfully charged a total of 246 individuals. Also on the same note FICAC over the years has seen a steady rise in complaints received from the public
FICAC says corruption is prevalent in the public sector, therefore it is promoting its proactive approach by conducting awareness sessions with public institutions and also by conducting Corruption Risk Assessments.
The increase in complaints received over the years underscores the growing public confidence in FICAC.
An analysis done by FICAC’s Monitoring and Evaluation Unit reveals that abuse of office, forgery and bribery are the common forms of offences in public sector. While public sector corruption is highlighted, it does not mean that other sectors are free from it. Infact there are indicators that corruption is common in all sectors.
It has been identified that corruption thrives because of weak policy statements, inadequate standard operating procedure within public institutions to guide officers, inadequate work process and procedures, compliance and enforcement within specific public sector institutions.
FICAC as of April 2009 established the Corruption Prevention Department as its proactive arm.
Apart from investigation, this department tries to build resistance against corruption in the society by carrying out Education and Awareness sessions with public institutes, schools and communities. It educates them about FICAC’s roles and responsibilities, its jurisdiction and their roles as individuals in the fight against corruption. FICAC also conducts Corruption Impact Assessments with Public Institutions to raise potential red flags and identify areas that may be susceptible to corruption.
Tomorrow, FICAC goes on its road shows, taking the commission to the people. It’s part of its obligation and ratification under UNCAC.
Let’s rally behind FICAC. As a watchdog against corruption it has done well so far. More reduction in corruption will benefit the country. It will ensure that development dollars are widely spread and reach the people they are intended for.

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