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PM: Paris Deal A Huge Step Forward

The new climate agreement adopted by consensus in Paris late on Saturday night has been welcomed by world leaders as a strong agreement that sets significant, achievable emissions cuts for
16 Dec 2015 12:47
PM: Paris Deal A Huge Step Forward
Prime Minister, Voreqe Bainimarama.

The new climate agreement adopted by consensus in Paris late on Saturday night has been welcomed by world leaders as a strong agreement that sets significant, achievable emissions cuts for global industry.

After receiving news of the adoption of the Paris Agreement, Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama said: “This deal represents a huge step forward for humanity in combating climate change.”

As is common for annual climate change negotiations, COP21 in Paris went overtime as parties wrangled to reach agreement on key elements of the text.

The Paris Agreement was adopted by consensus among the 196 member States to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

That did not mean, however, that all parties were satisfied with the text.

It is a deal that represents compromises by all parties and seeks to accommodate everyone’s demands to reach an agreement.

After these intense negotiations, the agreement still reflects many elements of the Suva Declaration.

“While this agreement was probably the best we could negotiate among so many countries, we must remain very clear-headed about the fact that our work is just beginning.

“An agreement is only as good as its implementation, and it will be up to us to make sure that all nations live up to this agreement,” the PM cautioned.

Mr Bainimarama also described the agreement as a recognition by the global community that serious action needs to be taken in order to stave off the ravages of climate change. The Paris Agreement seeks to keep global temperature rise this century well below two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, with efforts to limit it further to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Mitigation efforts are to be reviewed every five years, with opportunities to recommit to stronger action as advised by the scientific community.

The language on financial mobilisation to vulnerable countries is also stronger in the new climate agreement and requires that developed countries assist developing states with the costs of adopting clean energy and climate resilience.

The agreement defines a roadmap to increase climate finance to US$100billion by 2020, with plans to establish a new provision of finance by 2025. Edited by Naisa Koroi.

Source: DEPTFO News

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