NEWS

Go To Chief Justice: A-G

Any matters pertaining to decisions made against a judge should be referred to the Chief Justice, says Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum. He was responding to a question by the Opposition Justice
12 Feb 2016 11:07
Go To Chief Justice: A-G
Swami Siri Giriji (left) of India with Attorney General during the parliament sitting yesterday. pic.......RAMA

Any matters pertaining to decisions made against a judge should be referred to the Chief Justice, says Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum.

He was responding to a question by the Opposition Justice spokesperson Semesa Karavaki in Parliament yesterday.

Mr Karavaki questioned the A-G on the number of decisions pending for each of the judges and to highlight the period that lapsed since the conclusion of the hearing in regards to each case.

In his response, Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said Mr Karavaki would know, as a practising legal professional, that when decisions were being talked about, questions ranged on the multitude of cases.

“They can be employment matters, criminal matters, civil matters and family court matters; the Honourable member would know decisions can pertain to full hearing motion, bail application matters and the question is what the decisions it has been referred to.

“Any issue pertaining to any outstanding decision, it will be best that you go to the Chief Justice; write to the Chief Justice,” Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said.

“We have been receiving complaints from some people waiting for decisions; the right to review is forwarded to the Chief Justice; in his absence it is then presented to the Chief Registrar and then they will liaise directly to the Parties concerned.”

Mr Karavaki asked the total number of High Court judges and how many of them were presently sitting.

Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said there were  28 High Court Judges currently sitting.

Opposition Public Service and Poverty Alleviation spokesperson Salote Radrodro said there should be strategies in place to ensure that there was a pool of qualified judges that would be able to fill the positions in future as recruiting expatriate judges from overseas was expensive.

Mr Sayed-Khaiyum reiterated it was important for Ms Radrodro to read the Constitution; as there were basic requirements and qualifications to recruit a magistrate or a judge.

“The reality is that there were people who didn’t want to take up the positions; some politicians advocated travel bans to Australia and New Zealand.

“Only recently the ban has been lifted. There are some very courageous locals who came and took up the positions and also off shore because the judicial system was not working; the judiciary needed to function and some politicians – they know who they are – and other people were putting travel bans and indeed they were successful,” he said.

“Today we are building it up and I am not here to give them figures but if they look at the number of Magistrates that we have, from the total number of magistrates there are more locals than expatriates in the magistracy.”

 

 

Edited by Nemani Delaibatiki

Feedback:  arieta.vakasukawaqa@fijisun.com.fj

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