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Tikoirotuma – Traditional Massage Heals

Vodafone Flying Fijians wing Asaeli Tikoirotuma has fully recovered from a damaged medial ligament in his left knee after traditional therapy. Tikoirotuma, who plays for the London Irish in the
21 Feb 2016 12:28
Tikoirotuma – Traditional  Massage Heals

Vodafone Flying Fijians wing Asaeli Tikoirotuma has fully recovered from a damaged medial ligament in his left knee after traditional therapy.

Tikoirotuma, who plays for the London Irish in the Aviva Premiership, sustained his injury two weeks ago against Worcester and was ruled out for six weeks by the club’s medical team.

The 29-year-old Ono-i-Lau native returned to Fiji on crutches and in a knee brace but is now walking freely due to a basic massage by his aunt who lives in Valelevu, Nasinu.

As any rugby player would know, injury is part of the game but for Tikoirotuma, he has had his aunt, who is gifted, that has looked after him since his primary school days.

“Every time I get injured when playing rugby I would always come to my aunt Finau and she would always massage me,” Tikoirotuma said.

“She really has a gift and I have always come to her whenever I had an injury. After that last game where I got injured, I was put in a knee brace and the doctors said I would be out for at least six weeks.

“So I decided to come home because I knew my aunt would help me.”

Tikoirotuma’s case is similar to that of Fijian-born All Blacks winger Waisake Naholo who recovered from a broken leg in four weeks due to traditional healing from his uncle Isei Naiova at Nadroumai, Nadroga, in time to make his debut for the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

Professional rugby clubs have their own physios and doctors who look after the team.  But while Tikoirotuma has the utmost respect for them, he said seeing his aunt is his alternative.

“It is a great feeling when you heal faster from traditional treatment or massages than what modern medicine or treatment can do. But coming back home and having this traditional treatment from my aunt is my alternative,” he said.

“Doctors and physios went to school for a reason and they have been taught everything by the book and while I respect them, there are also people out there who are gifted.

“For me as an individual, I do not mind having both modern and traditional treatment but I know rather than having to be in a brace for six weeks, this is much quicker.”

Though he initially came to the country for treatment from his aunt, it has also given him a good opportunity to spend quality time with his family.

“I always love coming back home because it also gives me an opportunity to see my old man, Savenaca Tikoirotuma,” he said.

“He is getting old and is very sickly, so I really do enjoy spending some quality time with him before I go back.

“I have not informed my club yet about my fast recovery but I’m sure when they find out they will surprised. I will need to undergo an x-ray following proper procedures before I’ll be all get back on the field.”

Tikoirotuma will return to London on February 28.

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