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New Seawall For Karoko Village

The people of Karoko Village in Cakaudrove, Vanua Levu are grateful to the US   Embassy for boosting their resilience to the impacts of climate change. The USAID, through its Coastal
03 May 2016 08:38
New Seawall For Karoko Village

The people of Karoko Village in Cakaudrove, Vanua Levu are grateful to the US   Embassy for boosting their resilience to the impacts of climate change.

The USAID, through its Coastal Community Adaptation Project (C-CAP), designed and constructed a 210 meters rock mattress revetment to protect the village coastline from erosion.

Douglas Sonnek, U.S. Embassy Deputy Chief of Mission (DCM) and Dr. Susan Brems, USAID Mission director for the Philippines, Pacific Islands, and Mongolia, led the celebration with Government representatives Roko Tui Cakaudrove Filimoni Naiqamu, divisional secretary Ropate Rakadi and community partners to commemorate the completed project.

“The structure also encourages the establishment of coastal vegetation, which will further stabilise the coastline and help to increase the community’s resilience to the impacts of climate change,” Mr Sonnek said.

He said USAID also helped build local capacity for improved disaster risk management through trainings and disaster simulation exercises.

Karoko Village had lost several meters of coastland, because of rise in sea level and waves were reaching homes and communal infrastructure during high tide.

Former village headman Kasiano Midralawa thanked the US Government for their kind assistance.

“Our community is a Catholic denomination and the US embassy and Government have blessed us and we are grateful for the new seawall,” Mr Midralawa said.

The USAID/Coastal Community Adaption project (C-CAP) has worked in 77 communities in nine Pacific Islands Nations in addressing their climate adaption needs.

USAID/C-CAP chief of party Nick Hobgood said working closely with C-CAP team, Karoko villagers identified the risks and impacts they had experienced in the past.

Mr Hobgood said through a participatory asset mapping exercise the community prioritised the infrastructure that was of most value and ranked its vulnerability to risks both actual and forecasted by climate scientists.

“This infrastructure prioritisation was then used to identify what project could be funded by USAID, the Karoko community members ranked the protection of coastline from storm surge and sea level rise as top priority.”

The USAID/C-CAP project worked with members of Karoko villagers with provincial Government agencies in developing the village’s first disaster management and risk reduction plans map.

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