NATION

‘Clinic Saved My Foot From Amputation’

Maika Rareba hailed the Foot Care Clinic at Rakiraki Hospital for saving his right foot from amputation. The Togavere resident in Ra said he received special foot care treatment for
04 Aug 2016 13:20
‘Clinic Saved My Foot From Amputation’
Togavere Peer Group member Maika Rareba (left), displaying his healthy meal recipes for the Minister for Health Jone Usamate at Rakiraki Subdivisional Hospital yesterday. Photo: Arishma Devi-Narayan

Maika Rareba hailed the Foot Care Clinic at Rakiraki Hospital for saving his right foot from amputation.

The Togavere resident in Ra said he received special foot care treatment for two months.

“Now I am the leader of the Togavere peer group in Ra and our group meets regularly to discuss healthy living and how to control it.”

The Minister for Health, Jone Usamate officially opened the Foot Care Clinic yesterday.

Mr Rareba demonstrated ways how to cook healthy meals for diabetic patients to the minister at the hospital.

Mr Usamate said the foot care clinic has been established to strengthen foot care services in the hospital and regular screening to identify high risk cases.

It is also to appropriate action to address their needs, inspection of the feet of every person living with diabetes and offering the correct advice should be a priority to the community to avoid unnecessary amputations.

“The service goal is preventing amputation through early detection of abnormalities, education of clients and empowering people living with diabetes to take more proactive approach to health and wellness,” Mr Usamate said.

The foot care nurse at Rakiraki Hospital, Jyoti Vijay, said the foot care clinic was necessary for the patients so that it could help prevent wounds and amputations as a result of diabetics.

“For the month of July the total number of wounds healed (wounds reversed) was of eight diabetic patients at the hospital. This was through the foot care clinic. We are happy that we are able to save patients from amputations.”

She said the foot care clinic gave special care to those diabetic patients who had wounds in their feet.

She said the results had been good since the initiation of the programme.

Meanwhile, Diabetes Fiji in line with Health Ministry NCD (non-communicable diseases) strategic plan, has embarked on a four year project that targets a holistic approach to the prevention of diabetes with a special focus on foot care.

 

One amputation in every eight hours

At the moment the amputation rate in Fiji for people with diabetes is now one person in every eight hours, according to Mr Usamate.

He said it was also shocking to note that one in three persons in Fiji are  now living with diabetes.

“Complications of diabetes have also increased and the amputation rate now in Fiji is one in every eight hours instead of 12.5 hours.”

He said this was a clear indication that there was a need for an alternative measure to contain this avalanche and has called on to the people living with diabetes to take ownership and be actively involved in the management of health.

“One of the many Government strategies in reducing the rate of NCDs is to increase the taxation of sugar sweetened beverages. This is apart from ensuring NCD medications are always available and the pharmacy opening hours are extended,” Mr Usamate said.

The Minister said, people must ensure that people living with or at risk of diabetes can still have a healthy and fulfilling life with appropriate actions and advice.

Edited by Jonathan Bryce

Feedback: arishma.narayan@fijisun.com.fj

 

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