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EDITORIAL :QVS Deserves Recognition For Incredible Rugby Feat In Face Of Extreme Challenges

While the whole country is talking about the sensational accomplishment of our Rio Olympic gold medal sevens rugby heroes, there is also another local sporting feat that needs recognition. It’s
16 Aug 2016 08:22
EDITORIAL :QVS Deserves Recognition For Incredible Rugby Feat In Face Of Extreme Challenges

While the whole country is talking about the sensational accomplishment of our Rio Olympic gold medal sevens rugby heroes, there is also another local sporting feat that needs recognition.

It’s the Queen Victoria School students’ domination of secondary schools rugby in a year that most people did not expect them to win anything after the destruction of their school by Tropical Cyclone Winston.

On Saturday, at the ANZ Stadium at Laucala, they won the Under-14, Under-15, Under-17 and Under-18 titles. They were also in the final in the Under-16 but they lost narrowly to Ratu Kadavulevu School. The only final they failed to reach was the Under-19.

That’s a remarkable achievement when you consider that since February they have been not together and have been transferred to different schools to continue their schooling.

They have been able to do it with the help of dedicated parents, families and relatives and the strong support of the old boys (ex-scholars).

The old QVS spirit was very much alive as fans of the school flocked to the ANZ Stadium to cheer for the boys from Vulinitu. The rugby reps did not disappoint them. They brought many to tears – the tears of joy – because they realised that the road to triumph was fraught with trials and tribulations. That they got there in the end was a tribute to their resilience and courage in the face of extreme challenges. They had to readjust to a new culture in the new schools they attended. They then had to find the time to attend the afternoon training, travelling from the different schools. At Matavatucou, they lived as if they were in camp. They slept at the same dormitories, ate at the same dining school, attend classes in the same classrooms, and followed the same school programme that allowed them time for sports. Because they were in one location, it made preparation for the rugby championships a lot easier and more effective.

Their relocation to other schools was a test of character and human endurance. If they can achieve this remarkable result under those trying circumstances, imagine what they are capable of achieving when they move back to their school. The school, which should be ready to reopen soon, will have modern state of the art facilities built by members of the Indonesian Defence Force.

Parents of one of the victorious rugby boys could not hide their tears of joy. They summed up their jubilation with these words: “This is the best thing that has happened in our family this year. It’s been a great journey. For six months our son had to humble himself and attend a school in Suva. It did not have all the things he enjoyed at QVS. But he soldiered on and persevered. We’re relieved that the experience he went through has helped him grow. Hopefully, it will set the platform for him to lift himself to another level when he returns to QVS. We know he will.”

It’s a wonderful response from two parents who stood by their son after Cyclone Winston struck. They did not allow the traumatic experience from the disaster ruin his life. He picked himself up from the mess at QVS, with his parents’ help, and decided to give it his best shot in the classroom and on the rugby field in the prevailing circumstances.

He and his rugby colleagues deserve our hearty congratulations for setting a great example.

 

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