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Fiji Airways, Fiji Link Passengers Asked Not To Use Samsung Note 7 Phones Onboard

As reports of Samsung Galaxy Note 7 batteries exploding continue to increase globally, our national airline has decided to take extra precaution to avoid any risks. Fiji Airways managing director/chief
14 Sep 2016 11:50
Fiji Airways, Fiji Link Passengers Asked Not To Use Samsung Note 7 Phones Onboard

As reports of Samsung Galaxy Note 7 batteries exploding continue to increase globally, our national airline has decided to take extra precaution to avoid any risks.

Fiji Airways managing director/chief executive, Andre Viljoen, confirmed passengers on both Fiji Airways and Fiji Link have been cautioned and advised on usage of these devices.

“Fiji Airways and Fiji Link strongly advises passengers not to turn on or charge these devices on board aircraft and not to stow them in any checked baggage,” he said.

“This is in light of recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices.”

 

Global trend

The precaution is not limited to Fiji Airways alone. Reports have come in from around the world where passengers are being asked not to use their Samsung Galaxy Note 7 devices on board the flights.

These include major airlines such as Qantas, Emirates, American Airlines, Lufthansa, Virgin, Jetstar, Singapore Airlines, Etihad Airways, amongst many others.

Passengers with these devices were being instructed to power them off completely, not to charge them on board and not to ship them in the cargo hold.

Samsung knows it has a problem and is taking countermeasures. An unprecedented 2.5 million of the smartphones were recalled beginning September 2.

The president of Samsung’s mobile communications business, DJ Koh, wrote in an advisory to Note 7 users, “We are asking users to power down their Galaxy Note7s and exchange them as soon as possible.

“We are expediting replacement devices so that they can be provided through the exchange program as conveniently as possible and in compliance with related regulations.”

 

Problems

The USA Today reported that shares of the electronics giant dropped seven per cent Monday in Korean trading.

Around US$14.3 billion has been wiped out in market value and extending a slide that have taken shares down 10 per cent this month.

This was as reports of damage from exploding batteries in the smartphone circulated, prompting Samsung officials to urge Note 7 users to turn off their devices and return them.

The past weekend, a 6-year-old boy in New York, USA, was burned when the Note 7 burst in his hands, reported the New York Post.

This follows reports from Florida, South Carolina and Australia, where users have described explosions in cars, homes and hotel rooms.

Feedback:  rachnal@fijisun.com.fj

 

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