Opinion

Ali, Sami, Matakibau Deserve A Medal For Helping Shukla Wati

Medical students  Simran Ali, Melissa Sami and Lave Matakibau deserve recognition and a medal for the way they fed Shukla Wati, 78, and worked with the Social Welfare Department to
04 Oct 2016 11:00
Ali, Sami, Matakibau Deserve A Medal For Helping Shukla Wati
From left: Fiji National University second year medical students, Lave Matakibau, Melissa Sami and Simran Ali. Photo: Simran Ali

Medical students  Simran Ali, Melissa Sami and Lave Matakibau deserve recognition and a medal for the way they fed Shukla Wati, 78, and worked with the Social Welfare Department to find her a home.

Their quiet act of compassion went unnoticed until the weekend when Shamima Ali of the Fiji Women’s Crisis Centre told the Fiji Sun.

The cash-strapped second year students went in to help without second thoughts.

They are a very special specimen of young people who have set a wonderful example for their peers and the rest of the nation.

They join the legions of Good Samaritans who are reaching out and touching the lives of many people in need and in distress.

Ms Ali, Ms Sami and Mr Matakibau are a perfect example of responsible citizenship.

Their act of kindness and compassion did not just happen on the spur of the moment that night.

They must have learned it in their childhood upbringing in their homes, their school and the community they lived in.

They recognised and made an instant connection with Ms Wati because they either have seen it happen before and they may have played a part.

Those early experiences have made an indelible mark in their minds and it’s impossible to forget.

When children learn kindness, respect, and empathy in their early years, they become part of their adult lives.

These are powerful internal strengths that make people forget about themselves and put others first.

The three students did not have money to spend to buy dinner, but through the grace of God, they were able to find enough to buy a serve of rice and curry. They went beyond that.

They contacted Social Welfare and facilitated in the admission of Ms Wati at the Samabula Senior Citizens Home.

This kind of compassionate service generates joy and peace to both the beneficiaries and  providers.

The students must be pinching themselves because it is not everyday that you come across opportunities to serve others.

The Hoodless House residents in Toorak, Suva, are already showing that when they finally become doctors, they will be really excellent doctors because they have displayed those inner strengths.

We also recognise and praise their parents who taught them those values.

Some experts say you can’t just talk about these values and expect children to understand them.

Children need to experience them. Many programmes like scouts, church groups, and service clubs are places children learn and experience these positive values.

But these values must first be taught and reinforced at home.

Parental example in practising compassion, honesty, fairness and responsibility, is an effective teaching method.

As they emulate their parents, children build character. They learn that service to others before self is a great human quality and a God-like attribute.

Service ensures that we have peace of mind and heart. It is at the very core of the humanity in us.

That’s what motivated the medical students to carry out their compassionate act.

Even in our position of weakness, we can still help if we have the desire.

Today, we salute the three students as our heroes.

Nemani Delaibatiki

Feedback:  nemani.delaibatiki@fijisun.com.fj

 

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