Letters

Letters To The Editor, 7th, October, 2016

Ratu Joni – a man ahead of his time Dorsami Naidu, Nadi This was a very humble person, a total liberal who believed in democracy and the Rule of Law.
07 Oct 2016 11:00
Letters To The Editor, 7th, October, 2016
Letter To The Editor

Ratu Joni – a man ahead of his time

Dorsami Naidu, Nadi

This was a very humble person, a total liberal who believed in democracy and the Rule of Law.

I first came in contact with this man in 1974 and that too very briefly when we participated in the finals of the National Quiz as respective captains of our high school teams.

Then the following year we met at USP as fellow students in the PII Social Science  programme. We became good friends. I was not aware of his chiefly stature at that time and he was not one to boast. We were the foundation members of the USP Volunteer Movement which was set up to help street boys and it was during this time he showed his true character as a caring and concerned individual for whom one’s racial or ethnic background was irrelevant .

He was a person who never sought position of leadership nor fame but his natural qualities of dignity and humbleness earned him the respect by all around him.

We were together at USP for one year and I left for Canterbury in New Zealand and he went to Adelaide in 1977 but we kept in touch.

He believed in a United Fiji and was saddened by the politics of race and disunity which prevailed and which continues to prevail simply because leaders want to hang onto power.

His famous letter to the Fiji Times in 1977 when we had our first political upheaval resulting in what is known as a Palace Coup said a lot about this 18-year-old chief who believed in democracy and was willing to buck the Nationalist bandwagon because like me, he believed in the “ Unity in Diversity “ catchphrase of that time.

On his return to Fiji he joined the civil service. In 1985 he took part in the Great Council of Chiefs meeting in Taveuni and though only 26-years-old he could visualise the political landscape of Fiji and could tell the political upheavals brewing on the horizon and attempted to avert it by stating that the democratic process must be followed and recognised. This did not endear him to the establishment. Subsequent events have shown him to be right.

His continued a principled stand throughout the dark period in our history from 1987 to the present day including his stand as Vice President speaks volumes for a man who believed in the quiet revolution through the ballot box however flawed it maybe.

His speeches and writings during this period which at times pulled no punches was his way of making a difference.

He had tried to influence political thinking in this country for the benefit of all communities. He believed in changing the hearts and minds of people through the pen rather than the sword.

His was a difficult path few wanted to follow.He did not believe in shortcuts. He believed in the principles of Gandhi and Mandela.

He died without seeing his dream of a one Fiji where people of different cultures, traditions and heritage brought together by destiny and who though proud of their rich history could live together in harmony  and peace as one people. History will remember him as a man of peace. May his soul rest in peace.

 

Deception

Malakai Naduva, Nauru

I am appalled at the level of deception that has blinded a certain church group in Fiji. They are willing to die for their leader even after he was convicted of rape. Then I am reminded that Satan the master of deception also used the word of God to deceive the woman, Eve which is a prototype of the present day churches today.

Some church leaders are using the word of God to cunningly obtain consent to sleep with their followers. Others use the world of God to cunningly steal from their followers.

The Bible says that “Satan is more cunning than any beast in the field”. I am beginning to imagine that Satan is now in control in the churches today. No wonder Chapter 18: 4 of the Book of Revelation commands “come out of her my people”.

 

Christ’s example

Savenaca Vakaliwaliwa, Canada

It is amazing to read that two non-Christian Members of Parliament have openly stood firm in voting against their allowance increase and have written to the Speaker Dr Jiko Luveni saying that they will not accept the increased allowances for parliamentarians (Fiji Village 5/10).

In doing so, they have followed the example of Jesus Christ without knowing it.

Before beginning His ministry as the Messiah or the Christ after being anointed at His baptism by John the Baptist, Jesus spent 40 days fasting for divine power and guidance (Mathew: 4).

After 40 days of fasting and prayer, He was hungry and the Satan tempted Him to turn stone into bread to satisfy His hunger.

Even though Jesus is one hundred percent God, He was also one hundred percent human like all of us and the tempter was trying to get Him to use His power as God the Creator to put Himself first and use His divine power to perform a miracle to satisfy His own need.

Had Christ did this, He would have sinned and the rescue mission to redeem humanity would have failed.

Jesus followed the Leader/Servant model of leadership in His earthly ministry and I applaud MPs Dr Biman Singh and Prem Singh for being true leaders of the people in this issue.

Allowance increase

Kirti Patel, Lautoka

I believe now that very soon our beloved country will and should come back on track since the allowances are given the green light by many ministers.

We believe now the minimum wage rate of many will also be looked into in no time. After all that’s the whole purpose of the ones in the top court; they should be considering, regardless of the allowances or wages being increased for them or not. Let’s see how much we are being cared for?

 

‘Miracle water’ and its lessons

Arien Vikash Kumar, Nadi

“One cannot doubt the power of the miracle water but in the meantime have forgotten some important lessons learnt during or after the visit from Dawasamu”.

After reading and hearing the experiences from those who have already been to the village and to the source of the miracle water, I want to say a ‘big vinaka’ to the villagers whose entire lives and daily routine have been changed since the discovery of the miracle water.

Day and night and ever since its discovery they are sacrificing and are there assisting and guiding people without any monetary gains in return.

May God bless these villagers as He did to the water.

Long queues, long wait, sleeping in the vehicles (or no sleep for some), travelling long distance and its costs, food and convenience, etc . . . are some major challenges one has to go through to get there.

Despite all these, there are thousands flocking daily to the site. Some are really sick, some look normal but get sick while waiting for more than 24 hours.

However there are no complaints so far from the public about anything as all are happy after the taste of the miracle water.

Of course, why would anyone complain if the “water is free” and miracles are happening overnight.

Standing in long queues for hours, without proper shelter, food, proper convenient, etc, etc is real test for one’s “Patience”, “Sacrifice”, “Need and hunger for instant recovery” and so forth.

Before the discovery of the Dawasamu Water, hospitals were the place where all the sick were rushing to.

With proper seats and shelter, spending an hour or so seems to be very long enough for some and we often lose patience and start complaining about the services, facilities, delays, doctors, nurses, etc.

But no one is complaining about their visit to Dawasamu.

If similar situations like Dawasamu occur in hospitals, the reaction of the public will not be the same.

Complaints of all sorts will start floating and will go viral on social media.

Many may lose jobs or may face disciplinary actions.

We don’t want to spend a night on hospital bed as overnight miracles doesn’t happen there but we are ready to sleep in vehicles for nights in hunger and in need of overnight or instant recovery.

We hardly visit hospitals for routine check-ups but we are going for the miracle water despite not being sick.

If the villages are not charging anything, the government should start charging at least $1 per head and with the money collected start some income generating projects for the villagers and also use the same money to upgrade hospitals in the country because sooner or later the very same people will make a u-turn.

Those that have been healed should go back to the village at least once and assist others with the villagers.

I think the miracle water not only heals the blind but it also opens the mind of the sick, but we are not able to see as we are too busy exploring the world after being recently healed from blindness.

 

IDC 2016

Suresh Chand, Nadi

This year’s Inter District Championship kicked off at the ANZ Stadium in Suva yesterday (Wednesday).

The IDC with more teams and games concludes in the same week and at the same venue without any problem or protest.

Smaller tournaments differ from this format and I wonder why.

If FFA has reasons doing so, I don’t want to know.

I wish Suva has fine weather to make everyone’s stay an enjoyable one. I hope FFA records a profit this year which helps in the development of the sports. Thank you.

 

Living in Laqere Market

Tomasi Boginiso, Nasinu

There is a couple living in the stall; day in day out, in very appalling conditions and no source of water and electricity; I just can’t understand how they are surviving.

The traffic fumes, the fish market surrounding, and people moving, what form of life the couple is expecting.

The couple seems to be in their 60s and in the weekend there seems be the children and their grand children seems to share the same conditions.

Hopefully the relevant authorities looks into the issue and help these people out.

Feedback:  jyotip@fijisun.com.fj

 

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