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Diet Vital in Fighting Cancer: Survivor

After 25 years of survival, patient Mereani Taginadavui encourages women to have regular checks.   Cancer survivor 55-year-old Mereani Taginadavui said it was of the utmost importance to look after
15 Oct 2016 11:00
Diet Vital in Fighting Cancer: Survivor
Cancer Survivor Mereani Taginadavui at the lauch of Pinktober at Tanoa International Hotel in Nadi. Photo:Arishma Devi Narayan

After 25 years of survival, patient Mereani Taginadavui encourages women to have regular checks.

 

Cancer survivor 55-year-old Mereani Taginadavui said it was of the utmost importance to look after one’s diet in order to help overcome the killer disease and prevent it.

Sharing her story during the launch of Pinktober at Tanoa International Hotel in Nadi on Thursday, Ms Taginadavui talked about her fight with the deadly illness.

“One of the things I have learned the strategy for the battle against breast cancer is building up the immune system. And for those who do not have breast cancer, to prevent it by eating the right kind of food,” she said.

Ms Taginadavui said young women needed to be aware that breast cancer was treatable and preventable and that the onus was on them to look after their lifestyle of eating

“It is your own initiative, what you need to do, and what you need to know about yourself.”

Since surviving cancer for 25 years, she recalled the day she became aware of the disease’s symptoms back in her village in Nabouwalu, Bua.

“I did not know that it was cancer as I had no idea at that time about breast health checks.”

She recalled the ordeal of being first diagnosed with stage three breast cancer at 38-years-old.

“I cried,” she said.

She also said her world had turned upside down in 1991 as she tried to come to terms with the fact that she needed to have her breast removed if she was to live longer.

“It was a hard decision, but it is one that I have never regretted, because it has kept me alive this far,” she said.

“I am so thankful to God for his wisdom that helped me to accept conventional medicine. This means chemotherapy, radiation therapy and mastectomy (the removal of my breast).”

The 55-year-old then made a decision to visit her parents in the United States where she had mastectomy.

She said going through chemotherapy was not easy.

She encouraged women to have regular checks. She has also encouraged them not to fear this disease, but to stand strong and fight it.

“If you know there is a lump in your breast, go and see a doctor. It is very important that we have to eliminate the fear,” she said.

Ms Taginadavui   has three daughters and one son and became a grandmother early this year.

Edited by Rusiate Mataika

Feedback:  litia.tikomailepanoni@fijisun.com.fj

 



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