NATION

Minister: Pass Rate Disappointing

The Minister for Education Mahendra Reddy is disappointed with the Fiji Sixth Year and Fiji Eighth Year Examination pass rate this year. And he is strongly urging primary school teachers
03 Dec 2016 11:00
Minister: Pass Rate Disappointing
Some of the graduates with the Minister for Education Mahendra Reddy at Labasa College on ThursdaY. Photo: JOSAIA RALAGO

The Minister for Education Mahendra Reddy is disappointed with the Fiji Sixth Year and Fiji Eighth Year Examination pass rate this year.

And he is strongly urging primary school teachers to pull up their socks because a failure in their part would be an injustice.

“You would have noted that our results for primary school external examination have been released, Year 6 and Year 8 and overall we are not pleased with the results,” Mr Reddy said.

“We need to prepare our students well in primary schools so that they are ready for high school and because of continuous progression.

“It will do injustice to our high school teachers if students fail to understand the fundamentals they should learn from primary school.”

He added that the low pass rates have been blamed on the primary school system.

“Our teachers have worked very hard at the primary school; I think it is time to look at new strategies, to roll out new strategies piece, to assist teachers in delivery with literacy and numeracy.”

 

OHS, First Aid training for primary schools

Fundamentals of Occupational Health Safety (OHS) and First Aid training will now be fully incorporated into the primary school curriculum with teachers fully equipped to teach them.

While officiating at the OHS and First Aid training graduation of northern primary school teachers in Labasa on Thursday, Mr Reddy said this was all a part of the ministry’s plan.

“We want all our teachers to have standard basic OHS and First Aid certification because we want our students to have basic knowledge on these subjects preparing them for the future,” Mr Reddy said.

“Some of the mishaps that occurred over the past years could have been prevented if students understood fundamentals of OHS and First Aid so we began this training last year. It will be difficult to provide them with knowledge separately, so an easier way is to train our teachers who can then incorporate this basic knowledge on First Aid and OHS while teaching the full curriculum.”

Two hundred and forty-four teachers, (two from each school), graduated after a one week training course at Labasa College.

The ministry’s National Trainer for Occupational Health Safety and Elementary First Aid, Veer Chand, said this was also in their pursuit towards zero accidents in school.

Mr Chand said this  was part of our ongoing efforts to promote elementary First Aid in schools, which the education ministry started last year to help make all schools around Fiji free from incidents.

“OHS is non-negotiable as we all have a duty of care, to guarantee the safety of our students and teachers.

“We must all recognise that a safe workplace will create healthy waters, increase productivity, contribute towards sustainable developments and create a positive image for the ministry of education,” he said.

Edited by Jonathan Bryce

Feedback: josaia.ralago@fijisun.com.fj

 

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