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Government To Appoint Younger People On Boards: Sayed-Khaiyum

One of the outcomes during the Attorney General’s Conference was the Government’s intention to include more younger people on boards of state owned enterprises. “Government looks forward to putting more
11 Dec 2016 11:00
Government To Appoint Younger People On Boards: Sayed-Khaiyum
Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum speaking at the Attorney-General’s Conference at the InterContinental Fiji Golf Resort and Spa, Natadola yesterday.

One of the outcomes during the Attorney General’s Conference was the Government’s intention to include more younger people on boards of state owned enterprises.

“Government looks forward to putting more and more different people on boards of state owned enterprises bodies- young people who in a few years’ time would gain valuable experience in the area and contribute on a much larger scale,” Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum said.

Mr Sayed-Khaiyum was rounding up yesterday the highlights at the end of the two-day conference at the InterContinental Fiji Golf Resort and Spa, Natadola.

Participants were given an update on the new laws such as Electronic Transactions Act which is being formulated amongst many other issues.

 

Directors Do’s and Don’ts:

“The laws are there to be complied with, and be adhered to. There are new standards set. There are issues of fiduciary duties of directors to the companies,” Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said.

 

Black, White or Purple- Does it matter?

The Government would have more United Nations rapporteurs coming every year to assess Fiji on different areas, Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said.

He noted that one of the issues raised during this session was the issue of the collation of data.

He suggested that when the need arose, it was better to randomly ask people if they were being discriminated against based on their race, gender etc.

This would be one way of assessing the situation rather than collecting data based on ethnic breakdown, which some people seemed to be obsessed with.

Keeping it out of the courtroom:

An entire session was dedicated to the alternate dispute resolution mechanisms that could be introduced in Fiji.

Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said he noted from discussions during the session that instead of Alternate Dispute Resolution, mediation could perhaps be known as Complementary Dispute Resolution.

Fiji needed to be able to adhere to international best practices and if Fiji was able to do that as a small nation it would also be able to attract investment into the country, he said.

“It gives an enormous potential to Fiji,” he said.

 

Confessions of an accused:

Adding on the sentiments by Chief Justice Anthony Gates about the failure of Amnesty International’s recent report on Fiji to provide concrete solutions, Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said such reports needed to be objective, fair and be able to make positive strides in that respect.

He said that there was a need to take a holistic approach and be able to understand the background the Police officers were coming from- what resources they had and the type of training they had.

“What is very critical is that we need private practitioners to work with us,” he said.

“Please volunteer your services. Work with the Legal Aid Commission and we would be able to resolve such issues a lot quicker.”

 

Digital Commerce:

Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said digital commerce also pertained to evidence and the manner in which lawyers carried out their transactions. He also discussed the possibility of e-filing of court documents. Edited by Rusiate Mataika

Feedback: jyotip@fijisun.com.fj


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