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Belgium Seeks Fiji’s Support For UN Bid

Belgium will seek Fiji’s support today in their bid to become a non permanent member of the United Nations Security Council. This was revealed yesterday by the Deputy Prime Minister
03 Jan 2017 10:01
Belgium Seeks Fiji’s Support For UN Bid
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs in the Belgium Government, Didier J L Reynders distributing stationeries to the students of Veseisei Primary. Photo: Shalveer Singh Aujla

Belgium will seek Fiji’s support today in their bid to become a non permanent member of the United Nations Security Council.

This was revealed yesterday by the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs in the Belgium Government, Didier J L Reynders.

Mr Reynders will meet senior Government officials today in Suva on this issue and other possible assistance other than the sugar industry mapping, which they are presently engaged in.

Mr Reynders said he was looking forward to Fiji’s support through talks with Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama.

Belgium could be looking at providing expertise to Fiji through their private sector in the fields of renewable energy and water production and sanitation.

He also extended an invitation for Fiji to be part of a meeting which will be held in Belgium with the main agenda being climate change.

Mr Reynders said Belgium was just as concerned about climate change and its effects on Pacific Island countries.

“We are organising a conference in Belgium in March this year where we will have a lot of people attending from the Pacific Islands,” he said.

“I have sent an invitation to the Prime Minister because are we trying to find some ways in helping these island nations.”

He said another area was ridding the oceans of pollution such as the large amounts of plastic found at sea.

Meanwhile, Mr Reynders said Belgium was looking at assisting Fiji through the diversification of products and markets when the Cotonou Agreement ends next year.

“We are thinking of the situation next year 2018 when the Cotonou Agreement comes to an end,” he said.

“It is very important to think of the diversification of some products and the diversification of the markets.”

He said Fiji could start looking at places besides the EU like Japan, South Korea as new markets.

The Cotonou Agreement is a treaty between the European Union and the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP).

It was signed in June 2000 in Cotonou, Benin’s largest city, by 78 ACP countries (Cuba did not sign) and the then 15 Member States of the European Union.

It entered into force in 2003 and was subsequently revised in 2005 and 2010. Edited by Naisa Koroi

Feedback:  charles.chambers@fijisun.com.fj

 



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