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Volkswagen Golf Mk7 1.4 TSI is here!

The Golf Mk7 1.4 TSI officially went on sale in Fiji Mid 2016. You know the car, you know the price, and you know how it performed in Sardinia. Let’s
04 Feb 2017 23:41
Volkswagen Golf Mk7 1.4 TSI is here!

The Golf Mk7 1.4 TSI officially went on sale in Fiji Mid 2016.

You know the car, you know the price, and you know how it performed in Sardinia.

Let’s see how lucky number seven fares on Fiji Roads. The Golf Mk7 is handsome, but unassumingly so.

It doesn’t say very much to me and there are certainly more striking designs to be had in this segment. But then again, there are also people who prefer their cars mature and understated like this. There are some interesting styling details though, even if you have to concentrate before you notice them. The side-on view shows the car’s balanced proportions to its best advantage.

A kink in the C-pillar panel is a clear nod to the original Golf, and the fuel filler cap is shaped to emulate the angles (the Mk6’s is circular), emphasizing that kink even further.

The overall effect is one of restrained dynamism, and U-shaped LED DRL bars add presence. Slimming the body are two swage lines, deeper and more pronounced than those on the Mk6, making the new car look sharper and tauter. Working to similar effect are more angular head and tail lamps, bumpers, wing mirrors and lower intake, as well as defined bonnet creases.

So the new car may not look worlds apart from the previous Mk6 on the outside, but to VW, clearly it’s what’s inside that  matters.

The biggest change is an all-new MQB platform. It’s a flexible one – designed for transverse-mounted engine applications, its variable parameters include track width, wheelbase and overhangs both front and rear.

Only the distance between the front axle and the bulkhead is fixed.

The EA211 1.4 TSI powerplant is also new, with 140 PS from 4,500 to 6,000 rpm and 250 Nm of torque from 1,500 to 3,500 rpm.

This engine loses the supercharger from the previous EA111 twincharged unit, which developed 160 PS at 5,800 rpm and 240 Nm of torque from 1,750 to 4,500 rpm.

Granted, the new car is slower to 100 km/h than the one before by about half a second, but as you can see, although there’s 20 PS less where peak power is concerned, all 140 horses kick in a full 1,300 rpm earlier and are sustained over a 1,500 rpm band.

Peak torque, up by 10 Nm, also enjoys a wider spread over the rev range, making the numbers, if anything, more accessible overall. Also, the Golf Mk7 is longer, lower, wider and lighter than its predecessor, resulting in more all-round cabin and boot space, and better fuel economy.

Add to that various other improvements here and there, and you can appreciate how, on paper at least, the new car is a little better than the old one in every area that matters.

Honestly, what can be said of the Volkswagen Golf that hasn’t already been said a thousand times over? With seven model generations, over 29 million sold and numerous accolades conferred upon it, you know that this is about as significant as cars get.

In order to fully appreciate its significance, we have to go back forty years in time.

Had the original Golf not happened, we might not have Volkswagen today.

Therefore we wouldn’t have the mighty VW Group with its impressive stable of marques, and the world’s second-largest carmaker would be someone else.

As Ford proved in the early days of motoring with the Model T, you can’t ride on just the one model’s wave of success forever.

Sure enough, Beetle sales were falling by the early 1970s (after having been in production since the war ended), and the company needed something other than that rear-engined, air-cooled platform if it wanted to survive.

Thanks to Audi, VW got the platform it needed, resulting in the Volkswagen Golf of 1974.  It wasn’t Wolfsburg’s first water-cooled, front-engined, FWD product – but it was given the arduous task of replacing the Beetle (and today we have both Golf andBeetle on sale).

It doesn’t say very much to me and there are certainly more striking designs to be had in this segment, but then again, there are also people who prefer their cars mature and understated like this.

There are some interesting styling details though, even if you have to concentrate before you notice them. Particularly like the side-on view, which I think shows the car’s balanced proportions to its best advantage.

A kink in the C-pillar panel is a clear nod to the original Golf, and the fuel filler cap is shaped to emulate the angles (the Mk6’s is circular), emphasizing that kink even further. The overall effect is one of restrained dynamism, and U-shaped LED DRL bars add presence.

 

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