NEWS

Weather Phenomenon?

A whirlwind or waterspout, sighted off Beachcomber Island, intrigued one of our regular letter contributors on Friday. Tomasi Boginiso of Nasinu was on the island resort when he spotted the
02 Apr 2017 11:00
Weather Phenomenon?
The whirlwind or waterspout was sighted off Beachcomber Island. Photo: Tomasi Boginiso

A whirlwind or waterspout, sighted off Beachcomber Island, intrigued one of our regular letter contributors on Friday.

Tomasi Boginiso of Nasinu was on the island resort when he spotted the weather phenomenon and sent pictures to Fiji Sun.

He said guests from abroad did not react saying it was common for them in their country.

He said the whirlwind or waterspout was visible for around 15 minutes before it disappeared.

But the Fiji Meteorogical Services says whirlwinds are not common in Fiji.

A Meteorological Service forecaster says the description could that be of waterspout but was very unlikely to occur in Fiji.

The forecaster said waterspouts were mostly found in Vanuatu.

Fiji Met said waterspouts form on liquid surfaces only at sea and originates from clouds and if there is a dense cloud formation then there will be a spike of clouds moving in a clockwise formation.

It normally happens after a sudden change in the wind direction and most waterspouts do not suck up water; they are small and weak rotating columns of air over water.

What is a whirlwind?

A whirlwind is a weather phenomenon in which a vortex of wind (a vertically oriented rotating column of air) forms due to instabilities and turbulence created by heating and flow (current) gradients. Whirlwinds occur all over the world and in any season. (Wikipedia)

 

Edited by Ranoba Baoa

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