NATION

Fight Corruption, Commission Encourages West Students

A group of high school students were told that they, as young leaders, sometimes forgot the value and essence they held in their respective schools, communities and societies. This comment
07 Apr 2017 14:29
Fight Corruption, Commission Encourages  West Students
FICAC chief investigator West Fred Driver (standing, middle) with students, teachers and some FICAC staff members in Lautoka on April 4, 2017.

A group of high school students were told that they, as young leaders, sometimes forgot the value and essence they held in their respective schools, communities and societies.

This comment was directed to them by the Chief Investigator West for the Fiji Independent Commission Against Corruption (FICAC), Fred Driver.

He was speaking to student representatives from secondary schools in the Western Division.

The students were invited to FICAC’s Western Division Office in Lautoka to attend the Young Leaders Seminar on Ethical Leadership.

“We fail to recognise other roles we can play towards building our communities and the nation at large,” Mr Driver said.

“Apparently, we are stuck on thinking about growth and development within our families and schools.

“Little do we realise that we need to set a legacy and shape its direction towards genuine inner worth values, accountability, transparency and excellence.”

Mr Driver said April 4, 2017, marked the end of FICAC’s 10 year journey, inclusive of its sustainable development processes experienced, improving governance and strengthening institutions with a broad perspective relating to the country’s neo-classical views.

He said it however marked the Commission’s beginning in its new endeavours in the future.

“Young Leaders Seminar on Ethical Leadership is what the Commission believes to embark on as part of its journey ahead.

“FICAC sees the importance of investing in the development of young leaders in the country to gather the support needed to fight corruption nationally and perhaps globally.

“The question we need to ask ourselves is; how different of a leader am I?

“Do I have interests, motives, passion, intentionality in learning and growth towards the role I was elected for? Leaders have vision and a mindset to change the world around them. Let us be one. Let us start to see the world differently and act differently in the way we carry out our leadership responsibilities.”

Mr Driver reminded the students that corruption was the enemy of growth and development.

He said it was an epidemic that continued to engulf resources and finances put aside for our national development.

“So do you agree that we as young leaders have an additional duty?

“It is the duty to help our beloved nation to stand against corruption.

“Remember, it all starts with the way we see and act in leadership.”

Mr Driver said corruption remained the greatest enemy of development in many developing countries of the world and Fiji was of no exception.

“It denies the development of infrastructures, education, health services, proper transportations employment opportunities and most importantly deprives the people from the necessities of life they rightly deserve through the greed of a few.

“It is therefore prudent that we collectively fight against these ills within our society.”

Edited by Jonathan Bryce

Feedback:  charles.chambers@fijisun.com.fj

Fiji Sun Instagram
Fiji Plus
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
error: