Letters

Letters to the Editor, May 2nd, 2017

STT effect on snooker Timoci Gaunavinaka, Nausori We thank the Government of the day for providing us free coverage of international sporting competitions like the heavyweight title fight between Anthony Joshua
02 May 2017 11:00
Letters to the Editor, May 2nd, 2017

STT effect on snooker

Timoci Gaunavinaka, Nausori

We thank the Government of the day for providing us free coverage of international sporting competitions like the heavyweight title fight between Anthony Joshua and Wladimir Klitschko on Sunday.

These are fights we used to watch only on pay channels before and only after paying $75 or so.

In the Attorney-General’s recent trip to Savusavu, the President of the Planters’ Club made a request for the Sales Turn-over Tax (STT) charged to private social clubs be reviewed.

This same tax is charged to resorts, nightclubs and public bars and etc. Although these “water holes” can charge up to 200 to 500 per cent above cost on their prices, private and social clubs cannot. So the total of 25 per cent tax on turn over charged (10 per cent  STT + 6 per cent Environment + 9 per centVat) takes a big portion of our gross profit making it very difficult to run a club. The problem faced by Planters Club in Savusavu is faced by all clubs in Fiji today. Some have even broken their fix deposits to pay STT.

The Sport of Billiards and Snooker in Fiji is only played in private and social clubs because only they have facilities for the sports. The Billiards and Snooker Association of Fiji (BSAF), the Southern Division Billiards and Snooker Association (SDBSA) and the North West Billiards and Snooker Association (NWBSA) do not own a snooker venue of snooker table to play the sport.

Only private social clubs like Defence Club, Nausori Club, Lautoka Club, Ba Central, Nadi Sports and Social and a dozen more have facilities for playing the sport. So when you heavily tax these clubs, you are heavily taxing the sport of Billiards and Snooker. These clubs purchase and maintain the facilities in playable condition, provide venue for tournaments, provide financial support to players representing them or Fiji offshore and much more.

The sport is multi-racial and therefore always stood for multiracialism thus our support for the FijiFirst Government. Our players fund-raised and donated close to $10,000 in total for the PM’s Flood Appeal while many sporting bodies who get aid from Government and are not taxed turned a blind eye. We fund-raised  and donated a few thousands of dollars to the Fiji Cancer Society, etc.

Today we are probably the only sport that is taxed under STT.


European Union grant

Shiraz Mohammed, Glenwood, NSW, Australia

The European Union has provided funding for training support to the sugar industry through the Australia Pacific Technical College.

Unfortunately, the cane farmers are once again not the direct beneficiary of the scheme.

What purpose do such initiatives serve if it does not assist the main players of the industry?

Looks like another wasted grant in the name of helping the sugar cane industry.


Fiji Basha

Savenaca Vakaliwaliwa, Surrey BC, Canada

Right baat! I fully agree with Tahir Ali that the Fijian vernacular language with a mixture of languages of the two major races should be promoted in Fiji, as we all Fijians feel comfortable to communicate well with one another in a common language.

Not only is it convenient and an advantage for all Fijians to be able to communicate in both of the two major languages; it is a must for people intending to visit countries with a large Indian population.

Out here in Canada, the iTaukei need to understand or be able to speak Fiji Hindi to communicate with Indians out here who do not speak English.

Feedback:  jyotip@fijisun.com.fj

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