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Wishes Come True For Cancer Children

Cancer patient four-year-old Taito Koroitukana made a wish and it came true on Monday following his operation last Ocotober. Young Taito’s wishes came true through the Make A Wish Pacific
26 Jul 2017 11:00
Wishes Come True For Cancer Children
Minister for Employment, Productivity and Industrial Relations Jone Usamate with the first 11 recipients of Make a Wish Pacific and their parents at the Grand Pacific Hotel on July 25, 2017. Photo: Lusiana Tuimaisala

Cancer patient four-year-old Taito Koroitukana made a wish and it came true on Monday following his operation last Ocotober.

Young Taito’s wishes came true through the Make A Wish Pacific organisation yesterday when he was given his computer game and toys.

He was one of the first 11 children that received what they wished for at the presentation ceremony at the Grand Pacific Hotel.

Make-A-Wish is a worldwide organisation which assists children with life-threatening illnesses Make-A-Wish’, and then sets about making that wish come true.

The 11 children were recommended  to Make-A-Wish Pacific by senior staff at the Colonial War Memorial Hospital in Suva; the Head of the Paediatric Department  Dr Ilisapeci Tuibeqa and the Paediatric Registrar  Dr Miri Thaggard.

Minister for Employment, Productivity and Industrial Relations, Jone Usamate, commended the organisation for doing something for our children.

Speaking at the Grand Pacific Hotel, Mr Usamate thanked them for making a difference in the lives not only for the children but for the parents as well.

Alumeci Koroitamana, who accompanied her son Taito to the function, said the organisation’s commitment is a humbling experience.

Mrs Koroitamana said a doctor recommended that Taito put in his wish following his review in March.

“Initially Taito was continually suffering from stomach aches, and when we brought him to hospital it was confirmed that he had cancer,” Mrs Koroitamana said.

“We went back for his review in March and we were told to return later in March to meet with the organisation and the patients’ wish list,” she said.

Mother of four, Mrs Koroitamana said the organisation’s initiative was a relief to parents whose children suffer from cancer.

“The anxiety and struggles we go through drains our energy, time and money and to have a partner that brings back hope to our children is a blessing,

Alumeci Koroitamana with her son Taito Koroitamana at the Grand Pacific Hotel on July 25, 2017. Photo: Lusiana Tuimaisala

Alumeci Koroitamana with her son Taito Koroitamana at the Grand Pacific Hotel on July 25, 2017. Photo: Lusiana Tuimaisala

“We live in Waidina Secondary School where my husband is teaching.

“I’m so thankful for their kind donation.”

Founder of the Make-A-Wish Organisation, Gilli Sinclair, said their plan was to bring a little joy and happiness to terminally sick children.

 

Background about Make-A-Wish Organisation

The Make-A-Wish organisation was inspired by an incident in America in 1980 which involved a 7-year-old boy named Chris Grecicius who had leukemia. Chris wanted to be a policeman and his mother, several friends and a group of police officers – with the help of the Arizona Department of Safety – made his wish come true; with a custom made uniform, helmet, badge and a helicopter ride.

Today Make-A-Wish is the biggest wish granting organisation in the world. It can found in more than 50 countries on five continents.

While Make-A-Wish is relatively new to the ‘blue continent’ the name sometimes given to the vast Pacific Ocean with its population of about 8-million, coming here has been under development for about a decade.

Much credit is given to Make-A-Wish-Pacific founder Gilli Sinclair who is CEO of the Cerebal Palsy Society in New Zealand and a member of the International Board of Make-A-Wish.She has driven the establishment of the 15 country Pacific group, to give the children of the region the opportunity to have wishes granted to enrich their lives with hope, strength and joy.

The chair of Make-A-Wish-Pacific Trust is Debbie Sorenson. Debbie has Tongan heritage and is well known around the region for her work with the Pasifika Medical Association and as a Director of Health Specialists Ltd which is an international management and consultancy organisation that has worked in five countries in the region delivering specialist health services and clinical advice and support. They’ve also implemented other services provided by the governments of New Zealand and Australia.

Edited by Karalaini Waqanidrola

lusiana.tuimaisala@fijisun.com.fj

 

 

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