NATION

Letter’s To The Editor, 28th, July, 2017

Auditor General’s report Sukha Singh, Labasa It is so painful to read the Auditor General’s report. The latest one is about the unsubstantiated expenditure. What pains me is that the
28 Jul 2017 11:00
Letter’s To The Editor, 28th, July, 2017

Auditor General’s report

Sukha Singh, Labasa

It is so painful to read the Auditor General’s report.

The latest one is about the unsubstantiated expenditure.

What pains me is that the ministers try their best to raise money from people like us by increasing the rates by 37 per cent and we have civil servants who allegedly use the money anyhow and keep on keeping on without worry or fear.

 

Mr Sudhakar’s comments

Meri Cava, Suva

Ashneel Sudhakar’s ‘pick’ on the media reporting on the Auditor General’s Report is unwarranted and naïve.

The report is a parliamentary paper. It is presented to the representatives of the Fijian people in Parliament who are paid by the tax payers of Fiji.

May I ask, are we the ordinary Fijians not intelligent enough to know what the Auditor General’s findings are?

Mr Sudhakar stated that “without testimonies from the Government Ministries and government funded institutions or full understanding of actions taken following closure of the audited review period, there cannot be an accurate assessment of findings in the office of the Auditor General’s report.” (Fiji Sun 27th July: PG 1)

If that is the law, why has Parliament allowed the Auditor General to present his findings to Parliament? He should have been asked to question all ministers and Government-funded institutions and presented their responses with the report. But the ball is now in the court of those implicated in the report.

Now, Mr Sudhakar and his committee is at liberty to ‘glaze’ his explanation to the awaiting public, but remember FijiFirst has put in lots of money in education to make us all critical thinkers and that is what Fijians are doing.

 

Commendable Police officers

Munsami Naidu, Lautoka

I would like to sincerely commend our Police officers for their availability at Lautoka’s Churchill Park on July 22, 2017 during the second Inkk Mobile Battle of the Giants (B.O.G) semifinal match between Lautoka and Nadi.

The eight Police officers stood firmly and bravely in the hot sun while facing and monitoring the crowd. They never, at any time, turned to catch a glimpse of the entertaining soccer match.

These officers’ hard work, which they have displayed in maintaining law and order, is commendable and they have shown the highest of professionalism.

I am absolutely sure that the majority of soccer fans must have appreciated what these Police officers did on the day.

I also would like to express salutation, appreciation and gratitude to other Police officers and Government for their hard work in maintain Fiji as the safest country in the world.

 

Jaywalking

Neelz Singh, Lami

It seems jaywalking is up another level – zigzag or L-walking – when crossing the road without following the traffic signals.

Hit-and-run is a crime, and rightfully so, especially when it leads to injury or death. That said, jaywalking is illegal for a reason.

Traffic laws are made to help protect pedestrians.

I was taught to look both ways and to use the zebra crossing only when the signal allows you to.

Today, many people use the streets as pedestrian walkways.

They assume vehicles will see them and stop. Vinaka

Feedback: jyotip@fijisun.com.fj


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