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Church University Proposal to Promote Christianity First, Secularism Second

  The Methodist Church strategic development arm has proposed to set up a Methodist university college. But for that to succeed, keeping in mind Christian values and beliefs, the committee
24 Aug 2017 11:00
Church University Proposal to Promote Christianity First, Secularism Second
From left: Deaconess Lorine Tevi, Reverend Immanuel Reuben, Methodist Church President Reverend Tevita Banivanua with Deaconess Unaisi Matawalu marking the 50th Anniversary for the Deaconess Order of the Methodist Church in Fiji at Centenary Church on August 23, 2017. Photo: Ronald Kumar

 

The Methodist Church strategic development arm has proposed to set up a Methodist university college.

But for that to succeed, keeping in mind Christian values and beliefs, the committee proposes it be a Christian institution first, secularism second.

Methodist Church Strategic Development Planning Committee chairperson Richard Wah said: “Christian foremost, secular second.”

Mr Wah was presenting the committee’s proposal to church leaders and officials in Suva yesterday.

“We need a Christian tertiary institution. Research has shown around the world that if people have strong Christian faith in their primary and secondary school education, when they go to university in their third year or fourth year degree – 50 per cent of our Christians lose their faith,” Mr Wah said.

“That means in our own church many of our leaders who had their faith in secondary school will lose it when they finish university. So most of our people, our brains in our church will be lost.”

He stressed that the proposed institution would ensure spiritual development, acquisition of skills, attainment of knowledge and entrepreneurial outlook for members.

“What we are doing now is presenting a proposal based on the economic situation in our country.

“We are basing our proposal on the large number of people who have been pushed out of our formal system. We have a vision of what this institution should look like.”

Mr Wah also questioned how the church was handling students of their faith who had dropped out of school.

“When our students start in class one in our schools in Fiji there is about 20,000 students and by the time they reach Form 7 (Year 13) only about 7000 students are left. 13,000 have fallen by the wayside. Out of that 13,000 many of them are Methodists. What are we doing for our people?

“We need to have flexible entry. We cannot say you must have Year 12 or Year 13 to go to our institutions, we must open it and let our people come in.”

Edited by Ranoba Baoa

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